The Grote Kerk (Church of Our Lady) is the most important monument and a landmark of Breda. The first notice of a stone church in Breda is from 1269. In 1410, the construction of the church started with the choir. In 1468, the church was ready but in 1457 the old tower collapsed and between 1468 and 1509 the current tower was built. They continued building until 1547 when the church was finished in its current shape.

In 1566, the Reformation took place and the church was no longer Catholic. In 1637, the church became Protestant. The tower spire burned in 1694 and the current spire was built in 1702. From 1843 onwards many restorations took place, the last big restoration took place from 1993 until 1998.

The organ in the Grote Kerk of Breda is one of the largest organs in the Netherlands and its history goes back to the 16th century. At that time, the organ only possessed 16 stops. After being displaced several times, the organ arrived at its present location in the church in 1712. After restoration of the church between 1904 and 1956, a new organ was ordered from D.A. Flentrop in Zaandam.

The Prinsenkapel (Prince chapel) north of the choir is the old mausoleum of the House of Orange-Nassau, ancestors of the Dutch Royal Family. The chapel was built from 1520 until 1525 on orders of the Lord of Breda, Henry III of Nassau-Breda. Seventeen family members are buried in the chapel.

When William of Orange died the plan was to bury him also in the chapel, but Breda was at that time occupied by the Spanish. William of Orange and most of his descendants were buried in the mausoleum in the New Church in Delft.

A special part of the chapel are the vault paintings from 1533. The frescos are made by the Italian painter Tommaso di Andrea Vincidor (a student of Raphael).

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Kerkplein 2A, Breda, Netherlands
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Details

Founded: 1410
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yiqiang Xie (2 months ago)
Simple gorgeous church. Definitely worth a visit if you are in Breda. They open the towel passage during special events. You can oversee the beautiful city of Breda.
Robert G. Thompson (3 months ago)
Exceptional history tour by church in this historic area. Be sure to go inside and have a look. Don't mind the construction going on to restore the church to its full glory. Tours are €1 and well worth it if you are into history. I believe the church's construction started in the 16th century and finished in the 18th century so plenty of melding of techniques. Enjoy!
Luckiwi (4 months ago)
Beautiful church, and fun to climb church tower to see Bergen op Zoom from above
Ádám dr. Ánik (7 months ago)
Very nice Church. The entrance is generally free, however during an exhibition event it is usually not. Climbing the tower is also possible if you have an online reservation in advance for 7,5 EUR.
Castellanos Jaime (10 months ago)
Beautiful Cathedral, very worth seeing. The entry is free but I do recommend booking in advance a guided tour to the bell tower for 7.50€ Very worth it and you get great views of the city from above! The guide is very knowledgeable and friendly
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