The Grote Kerk (Church of Our Lady) is the most important monument and a landmark of Breda. The first notice of a stone church in Breda is from 1269. In 1410, the construction of the church started with the choir. In 1468, the church was ready but in 1457 the old tower collapsed and between 1468 and 1509 the current tower was built. They continued building until 1547 when the church was finished in its current shape.

In 1566, the Reformation took place and the church was no longer Catholic. In 1637, the church became Protestant. The tower spire burned in 1694 and the current spire was built in 1702. From 1843 onwards many restorations took place, the last big restoration took place from 1993 until 1998.

The organ in the Grote Kerk of Breda is one of the largest organs in the Netherlands and its history goes back to the 16th century. At that time, the organ only possessed 16 stops. After being displaced several times, the organ arrived at its present location in the church in 1712. After restoration of the church between 1904 and 1956, a new organ was ordered from D.A. Flentrop in Zaandam.

The Prinsenkapel (Prince chapel) north of the choir is the old mausoleum of the House of Orange-Nassau, ancestors of the Dutch Royal Family. The chapel was built from 1520 until 1525 on orders of the Lord of Breda, Henry III of Nassau-Breda. Seventeen family members are buried in the chapel.

When William of Orange died the plan was to bury him also in the chapel, but Breda was at that time occupied by the Spanish. William of Orange and most of his descendants were buried in the mausoleum in the New Church in Delft.

A special part of the chapel are the vault paintings from 1533. The frescos are made by the Italian painter Tommaso di Andrea Vincidor (a student of Raphael).

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Address

Kerkplein 2A, Breda, Netherlands
See all sites in Breda

Details

Founded: 1410
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

tushita sarkar (12 months ago)
Besides the historical importance,the sight of this church lights up your mood every time you see it!Do not miss out the special lighting and effects which changes the total atmosphere during Christmas and other special feast days.
Calem Philbeck (13 months ago)
So beautiful, if you love architecture, definitely worth a visit!
Nick Manarangi (2 years ago)
Impressive church with lots of historical references to read
Esther Snippe (2 years ago)
Just beautiful at night! We made a circle around the Groot Markt, and this was the star of the show. Really nicely lit up.
Mark van Raaij (2 years ago)
Beautiful old historic church. Free to visit, although a small donation is suggested. Several important Dutch historic leaders are buried here. Restauration is being done in a tasteful way, explanations in Dutch, but also some in English are given. Well worth a visit.
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