Heusden Castle Ruins

Heusden, Netherlands

The settlement of Heusden, bordering on the river Meuse (Maas), as we know it today dates back to the 13th century, and started with the construction of a fortification to replace the castle that was destroyed by the Duke of Brabant in 1202. This fortification was quickly expanded with water works and a donjon (castle keep). The city of Heusden received city rights in 1318. The castle of Heusden was the property of successive dukes of Brabant, in 1357 it went over to the counts of Holland.

With the construction of ramparts and moats the castle became located within the city's fortifications, and the castle lost its function as a stronghold. The donjon was now used as a munition depot. A disaster marked the end of the castle of Heusden and caused the economic demise of the city; on 24 July 1680 a terrible thunderstorm hit Heusden, and lightning struck the donjon. Sixty thousand pounds of gunpowder and other ammunition exploded, and destroyed the castle. It took the people of Heusden seven weeks to clear the rubble and debris. The castle was never fully rebuilt. However, the original outlines of the main features were restored in 1987.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Netherlands

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aart Schalk (20 months ago)
Fantastic!
Edo Vonk (2 years ago)
Good place for a walk and to play or to fly kite or just to enjoy the views.
Sabrina Versteeg (2 years ago)
It's a nice piece of history combined with a playground so it's perfect for young and old
Beau Denheijer (2 years ago)
Nice envorniment to watch and also details about the buildings. a must go
Marlon Sherman (3 years ago)
Classic Dutch historic fortress town perfect for a day trip of sightseeing. Nice caf├ęs in town square for a bit to eat and a drink.
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