Heusden Castle Ruins

Heusden, Netherlands

The settlement of Heusden, bordering on the river Meuse (Maas), as we know it today dates back to the 13th century, and started with the construction of a fortification to replace the castle that was destroyed by the Duke of Brabant in 1202. This fortification was quickly expanded with water works and a donjon (castle keep). The city of Heusden received city rights in 1318. The castle of Heusden was the property of successive dukes of Brabant, in 1357 it went over to the counts of Holland.

With the construction of ramparts and moats the castle became located within the city's fortifications, and the castle lost its function as a stronghold. The donjon was now used as a munition depot. A disaster marked the end of the castle of Heusden and caused the economic demise of the city; on 24 July 1680 a terrible thunderstorm hit Heusden, and lightning struck the donjon. Sixty thousand pounds of gunpowder and other ammunition exploded, and destroyed the castle. It took the people of Heusden seven weeks to clear the rubble and debris. The castle was never fully rebuilt. However, the original outlines of the main features were restored in 1987.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ros Laighleis (3 years ago)
Beautiful scenic village. Around every corner is another wonder. This castle is a great place to walk around. Kid friendly neighborhood and plenty of options for eating and drinking.
A S (3 years ago)
Nice place for the day out!!
Paris Giazitzidis (3 years ago)
Very beautiful village to visit on a sunny Sunday!
Ariel van den Bosch (4 years ago)
Fantastic climat at night!
Willem Van de merbel (4 years ago)
Not as big as it looks in the pictures. Souds really old but looks like its been build 5 years ago. Woold not recomend iff you live further awat then walking distance
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