Reichenstein Castle, also called Falkenburg, is located above Trechtingshausen. The large construction is one of the spectacular examples of the castle reconstruction in neo-Gothic style. Reichenstein Castle, built in the 11th century, was owned by a robber-baron. Therefore it was destroyed in 1253 and again in 1282. It decayed since the 16th century.

In 1834 Friedrich Wilhelm von Barfuß started the reconstruction. Baron Kirsch Purcelli bought the castle in 1899 and continued generously the work of reconstruction. The shield wall is particularly noteworthy.

In the castle are to be found in addition to the largest collection of cast-iron plates in Rhineland-Palatinate 1200 hunting trophies from all over the world, weapons, arms, porcelain and furniture from five centuries.

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Details

Founded: 1100
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Orlando Andico (4 months ago)
I love this place. The restaurant, while not Michelin rated, is great and in my opinion worthy of a Michelin Plate or Bib Gourmand. Cheap and good selection of rieslings. Great view over the Rhine. The downside is that the hotel rooms aren't air-conditioned, and if you crack open the window you can hear the trains running all night. Would go back again.
valentina t (6 months ago)
Great meal, service, view. Everything was very professional. I recommend it.
Lukasz Macht (9 months ago)
It's a former medieval castle which has been rebuilt in 19th century and used as a residence. At this moment it's a restaurant and hotel. The museum part is a bit of an afterthought and focuses on the time when the castle was a private residence. Is still a great sight and one of the largest castles on the Middle Rhine
Christyan Brown (10 months ago)
A huge castle, very fully furnished. You can do an excellent self guided tour with the map handed out with admission. The height you can climb to in the tower and the size of the castle are truly inspiring.
Carlos Andres Castro (10 months ago)
Very modern and comfortable accommodations in a beautiful old castle setting. Restaurant was surprisingly good. Walkable from the train station. A bit pricey.
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