Reichenstein Castle, also called Falkenburg, is located above Trechtingshausen. The large construction is one of the spectacular examples of the castle reconstruction in neo-Gothic style. Reichenstein Castle, built in the 11th century, was owned by a robber-baron. Therefore it was destroyed in 1253 and again in 1282. It decayed since the 16th century.

In 1834 Friedrich Wilhelm von Barfuß started the reconstruction. Baron Kirsch Purcelli bought the castle in 1899 and continued generously the work of reconstruction. The shield wall is particularly noteworthy.

In the castle are to be found in addition to the largest collection of cast-iron plates in Rhineland-Palatinate 1200 hunting trophies from all over the world, weapons, arms, porcelain and furniture from five centuries.

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Details

Founded: 1100
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

gabriella gaita (5 months ago)
Just visited the castle and had lunch at their restaurant overlooking the Rhine. I can be spoiled like this every day :) Great castle tour was 9.5 euros per person, visit includes earphone tour, cute explanations- if taking your time, allow 2 hours, 3 with lunch! Enjoy.
Guido Oswald (6 months ago)
Best Burg in town. Must see for all tourists interested in mid evil castles. Nicely renovated. Restaurant is also excellent with great view on the Rhine river.
Vanessa Czolada (6 months ago)
I brought my family to this castle in March. I had previously been in December. It's great with some ruins and finished spaces. You get to tour around by yourself and they give you an audio guide. When I went in March, they were inexplicably closed. It stated they were open on their website. They offered no explanation or apology. Just "we're closed".
Vince Olfert (7 months ago)
We stopped here randomly and were we surprised!!! Well kept, lots of family memorabilia. Super interesting. Worth the stop!
Daniel Ord (8 months ago)
We’re locals and decided to spend an evening just to get away and enjoy. And so glad we did. The room with the private terrace was great and look at that wonderful view. And at dinner the food was lovely and the service attentive. We’re definitely going to visit again either the restaurant, the hotel or both. And the castle is fun to explore too.
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Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

The site is surrounded by three ditches cut out of the rock with stone ramparts, encircling an area of around 45 metres diameter. The remains of numerous small stone dwellings with small yards and sheds can be found between the inner ditch and the tower. These were built after the tower, but were a part of the settlement's initial conception. A 'main street' connects the outer entrance to the broch. The settlement is the best-preserved of all broch villages.

Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

At some point after 100 AD the broch was abandoned and the ditches filled in. It is thought that settlement at the broch continued into the 5th century AD, the period known as Pictish times. By that time the broch was not used anymore and some of its stones were reused to build smaller dwellings on top of the earlier buildings. Until about the 8th century, the site was just a single farmstead.

In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.