Rheinstein castle was constructed around 1316-1317. It was important for its strategic location. By 1344, the castle was in decline. By the time of the Palatine War of Succession, the castle was very dilapidated. During the romantic period in the 19th century, Prince Frederick of Prussia (1794–1863) bought the castle and it was rebuilt.

In 1975 the opera singer Hermann Hecher bought the castle. It's due to him that Rheinstein Castle became again one of the centres of attraction in the Rhine Valley. Around the apartment tower from the 14th Century you find neo-Gothic sets, turrets, terraces and iron stairs. Inside are stained glass windows and mural painting as well as a Renaissance fire-place and stylish furniture.

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Details

Founded: 1316
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Kusch (3 months ago)
Impressive castle nestled into a very steep rock. There is free 2 hr-parking for maybe 40-50 cars alongside the freeway. The walk to the castle is rather steep. There is a restaurant on the premises, which serves small dishes as well as a few more elaborate entrees, nut nothing can be considered 'fine dining'. It is advisable to check the opening hours and their vacation times, which change seasonally. They can be found on their homepage.
Andy Dincher (6 months ago)
Well, decorated Romantic reconstruction. The self-guided tour is easy to follow. Climb as high as you can for sweeping views.
O Adams (8 months ago)
If you want to have a good idea of live in a castle this is a good place to come. Well preserve, spectacular views of the river and mountains and well preserved items of the old ages. Don't forget that good hill walk is also good for the health.
Oleg Shevtsoff (8 months ago)
Nice castle. Not very big, well maintained, offers good self-guided tour. Nice views, a lot of open rooms. In good hands, definitely. PS: Toilets have deafening hand dryer, kids got scared.
Kent West (12 months ago)
Enjoyed the tour of the castle. It was especially good see a castle that wasn't in ruins. The cafe at the top had a great view of the Rhine river valley. They allow you to bring your own food and drinks so you can make it economical if you need to. Only €5 entrance charge. Definitely worth a stop or as part of the ring tour.
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