Ansembourg Old Castle

Ansembourg, Luxembourg

Ansembourg Old Castle is one of the castles belonging to the Valley of the Seven Castles. Located high above the little village of Ansembourg, the medieval castle is the private residence of the current Count and Countess of Ansembourg.

The property is first mentioned in 1135 when the lord of the castle was Hubert d'Ansembourg. The fortifications were probably built in the middle of the 12th century. At the beginning of the 14th century, the south-western tower gate and the northern keep appear to have been built by Jofroit d'Ansembourg. Since the times of Jakob II de Raville-Ansembourg, the castle does not appear to have been significantly altered. The main entrance bears the date of 1565. In 1683, the castle was damaged by the French troups of Marshal de Boufflers. In the 17th century, repairs were carried out by the Bidart and the Marchant et d'Ansembourg families who built the New Castle of Ansembourg.

Today the castle is owned by Count Gaston-Gaëtan de Marchant et d'Ansembourg who moved into the property after the death of his father. At the end of 2008, the Luxembourg government acquired the family's library (around 6000 books) and were offered the family archives. Interest had grown in the collection after the Codex Mariendalensis manuscript telling the story of Yolanda of Vianden was found in 1999 by the linguist Guy Berg. The manuscript dating from the end of the 14th or beginning of the 15th century was especially significant as it was written in the Moselle Franconian dialect which is closely related to modern Luxembourgish.

The castle is strictly private property and is not open to visitors. Recently, the Count of Ansembourg opened a very exclusive boutique hotel, in one of the buildings surrounding the castle.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robin Jensen (31 days ago)
Lovely grounds. Was lucky to get a guided tour on Journée de Patrimoine..owners are very spiritual and put an "interesting" slant on their analysis of the property features and landscaping. Well worth a visit nonetheless
sofiaseptember1961 (41 days ago)
Nice building, only from the outside side you can see but its interesting, as well as the garden the statues and the ponds!!! It's worthy yo visit it!!!!
Fabricio Gouvea (2 months ago)
It has great potential, but not realized yet.
Iliana Kolliri (3 months ago)
The woman responsible for the castle was one of the rudest one I have ever met and I have been in many similar (or even) better places. She talked to us in a very rude way (we went after 6.30 pm, not knowing that it was closed and she ‘welcomed’ us with her issues, obviously.. She did not even respect covid distances..Désolée, very disappointing personnel.
Mina Hosein (12 months ago)
Very nice place with a beautiful garden. Best place for relaxation and taking good photos.
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