Mersch Castle is one of the castles belonging to the so-called Valley of the Seven Castles. The castle was built in the 13th century by Theodoric, a knight in the service of Countess Ermesinde of Luxembourg. It was captured and burnt down by the Burgundians. In 1574, Paul von der Veltz transformed the building into a comfortable castle in the Renaissance style. The keep had large windows and the property was surrounded by a protective wall with seven towers. Finely vaulted ceilings were erected over the rooms on the ground floor and the first floor. The Knights' Hall on the second floor has a magnificent chimney. The arms of 16 noblemen decorated the walls. In 1603, the castle was again destroyed by the Dutch. In 1635, during the Thirty Years' War, the castle and the village were left in a sorry state. However, around 1700, it was once again repaired, this time by Johann-Friedrich von Elter who rebuilt the gate and appended his coat of arms. The chapel was restored in 1717 by von Elter. The altar bears the arms of the castle's heiress, Charlotte von Elter.

In 1898, the Sonnenberg-Reinach family sold the castle to a businessman called Schwartz-Hallinger. In 1930, restoration work was carried out by the owner M. Uhres. In 1938, a youth hostel was housed in a new building adjacent to the castle. From 1957, the commune acquired the building but sold it to the State of Luxembourg in 1960. As a result of an exchange agreement, the commune finally regained ownership in 1988 and undertook substantial renovation work for the needs of itse administrative services which now occupy the building.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

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Wemerson Lopes (3 months ago)
Mersch Castle is a castle in Mersch, in central Luxembourg. It is the seat of the local administration. The castle was built in the 13th century, and was the seat of the Counts of Mersch. It was rebuilt in the 17th century, and was the seat of the local administration until the construction of the current town hall in the 19th century. The castle is open to the public, and houses a museum of local history. I went that with my family but the place was close. They have a very good surrounding area that can be enjoyed.
Carlos Coimbra (3 years ago)
Très bien
Danièle Schiltz (4 years ago)
Hier kann man ein bisschen verweilen und sollte anschliessend umbedingt den Park besuchen. Der ist einfach toll angelegt.
Michel Simon (4 years ago)
Good
Anjo Tattoo (4 years ago)
Lindo e muito bem conservado.
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