In the 13th century, the Lords of Wiltz built a fortified castle on a rocky promontory, initiating the development of the upper town of Wiltz. In 1388, the French attacked the town and burnt the castle down but it was soon repaired. In 1453, Wiltz was again attacked, this time by the troops of Philip of Burgundy. The round Witches' Tower to the east of the gardens is the oldest part of today's castle. Under Count John VI of Wiltz, the construction of today's Renaissiance style castle was begun in 1631. After delays caused by the Thirty Years War, the main building was not completed until about 1720. The old chapel was finished in 1722 and the monumental staircase leading down to the gardens was completed in 1727. The castle premises were acquired by the State of Luxembourg in 1951 for use as an old people's home.

Since 1953, Wiltz Castle has been the venue of an international music festival attracting artists and orchestras of international repute. Since 1999, the castle's stables have housed the National Museum of Brewing. The museum traces the history of beer production over the past 6,000 years, especially more recent developments in Luxembourg. The little tanning museum (Musée de la Tannerie) presents the history of the leather industry in Wiltz which dates from 1644.

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Address

Grand-Rue 2, Wiltz, Luxembourg
See all sites in Wiltz

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J B (2 years ago)
Verwacht geen gigantisch museum met tanks en vliegtuigen... Maar dat maakt het absoluut geen slecht museum, enkel voor de kleintjes onder ons wat saai misschien. Je kunt hier goed zien hoe het verzet lokaal opereerde en eindeloos lezen begeleid door indrukwekkend beeld en foto materiaal over de gevolgen van de tweede wereldoorlog en de Duitse bezetting ter plaatse.
Jan Overbeek (3 years ago)
Small and fun museum. Nice to spent a few hours in here.
Dave Ward (3 years ago)
Nice but pricey
John R CARNELL (3 years ago)
Super interesting, very well done, highly recommended.
Richard Ellis (3 years ago)
lovely place
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