Wintrange Castle built around 1610 by Alexandre de Musset, the Lord of Foetz. The main building with its four towers still stands today. Fortifications and a gunport were added as defences during the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648). The barn with a fifth tower was added in the 18th century. In 1938, the industrialist Nick Schlesser bought the property. The castle was badly damaged in the 1940s when it was used by the German troops during the Second World War and then by the American troops at the end of the war. Nick Schlesser's son, Henri, fully restored the building which is now owned by his son Philippe, who continues the restoration.

The castle is a historic landmark in the Moselle valley and is surrounded by a 1.5 hectare private park. Adjacent to the estate is the Haff Remich bird sanctuary and national park with lakes and ponds stretching down to the river.

The castle is privately owned and can be rented for weddings, events, movie and photo location, but is not open to tourists or guided tours. Visitors are admitted by appointment only.

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Founded: 1610
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gaston Trauffler (2 years ago)
Sandra B. (2 years ago)
Mic Laboite (2 years ago)
Très jolie promenade !
Sacha Rein (2 years ago)
A beautiful place with rustic charm.
flepster (4 years ago)
Beautiful romantic event space in wine country, surrounded amazing wineries. Great location close to LUX airport, Luxembourg city, France and Germany. Accessible yet secluded Renaissance castle, and simply a lovely national historic monument in its splendid park property. A very welcoming family space.
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