Monaise Palace

Trier, Germany

Between 1779 and 1783, the Dean of Trier Cathedral, Philipp Franz Count of Walderdorff had a summer residence built on the west bank of the Moselle in the style of early French neo-classicism. The architect engaged was the French master builder François Ignace Mangin. Situated directly on the bank of the Moselle, the residence faces northeast and thus lies in the direct line of sight to Trier. The name Monaise means 'my leisure', pointing to the original function of the palace as a summer residence.

The structure belongs to the few examples of early French neo-classicism in Germany. The style developed in France during the reign of King Louis XVI and is therefore called Louis Seize Style. The height of the structure is remarkable in comparison to the small surface area at ground level, only 10x20 m. The main façade is characterised by a tri-part central projection with four Ionic columns in the upper storeys, with balcony behind. Crowning the central projection is a coat of arms held by two lions rampant. The motto underneath, 'OTIUM CUM DIGNITATE', means more or less 'Enjoy leisure with dignity'. The palace is surrounded by a sandstone balustrade and four small corner pavilions.

When the owner, Count of Walderdorff, became Prince Bishop of Speyer in 1791, he sold the palace to Eleonore of Blochhausen, the widow of a court legal advisor in Luxembourg. Later, it fell into the hands of various owners. Beginning in 1920, it belonged to the United Hospitals and, in 1969, it was bought by the city. As the palace had not been used for a long time, its condition continued to deteriorate, although shoring-up measures were conducted again and again. Numerous attempts to save the building always failed in the end because of lack of finances. The restoration of Monaise get underway in 1992 and was finished in 1997.

Monaise houses nowadays , among other things, a top-quality restaurant.

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Details

Founded: 1779
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ychung77 (2 years ago)
Awesome place with stellar prep of fish dishes. The wine list is also very reasonable
Marshall Knight (2 years ago)
Nice place for a walk. Resteraunt and horse stables are nearby.
Andreas Persike (2 years ago)
Ich war nur im Garten aber der war toll
Christian Ruppert (3 years ago)
Super schönes Ambiente, gutes Essen, freundliches Personal. Nur zu empfehlen. Sehr schön in Sommermonaten, bittet sich sehr an zum verweilen.
Robert Hornung (3 years ago)
wondering why the best restaurant in trier and Luxembourg area only has 3.9 stars/ points. in fact the only place around worth 5*
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