Monaise Palace

Trier, Germany

Between 1779 and 1783, the Dean of Trier Cathedral, Philipp Franz Count of Walderdorff had a summer residence built on the west bank of the Moselle in the style of early French neo-classicism. The architect engaged was the French master builder François Ignace Mangin. Situated directly on the bank of the Moselle, the residence faces northeast and thus lies in the direct line of sight to Trier. The name Monaise means 'my leisure', pointing to the original function of the palace as a summer residence.

The structure belongs to the few examples of early French neo-classicism in Germany. The style developed in France during the reign of King Louis XVI and is therefore called Louis Seize Style. The height of the structure is remarkable in comparison to the small surface area at ground level, only 10x20 m. The main façade is characterised by a tri-part central projection with four Ionic columns in the upper storeys, with balcony behind. Crowning the central projection is a coat of arms held by two lions rampant. The motto underneath, 'OTIUM CUM DIGNITATE', means more or less 'Enjoy leisure with dignity'. The palace is surrounded by a sandstone balustrade and four small corner pavilions.

When the owner, Count of Walderdorff, became Prince Bishop of Speyer in 1791, he sold the palace to Eleonore of Blochhausen, the widow of a court legal advisor in Luxembourg. Later, it fell into the hands of various owners. Beginning in 1920, it belonged to the United Hospitals and, in 1969, it was bought by the city. As the palace had not been used for a long time, its condition continued to deteriorate, although shoring-up measures were conducted again and again. Numerous attempts to save the building always failed in the end because of lack of finances. The restoration of Monaise get underway in 1992 and was finished in 1997.

Monaise houses nowadays , among other things, a top-quality restaurant.

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Details

Founded: 1779
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chef Se (10 months ago)
This place is just a dream for every foodie and wine lover. Flavors are powerful, chef not scared to season properly. Every course was excellent. My second visit and it's always unique lasting experience.
Rowrider Blake (14 months ago)
The best place in Trier and Luxembourg. And the only one deserving five stars. Marvelous ingredients, inspired recipes, perfect execution. Simple, to the point, best and best value wine list. Nothing to add, nothing to change. Whenever you have a chance, go and enjoy, as such an ensemble is not common.
Vanessa Garcia (2 years ago)
Best meal I’ve ever had in Trier!
Mairead Christie (2 years ago)
Simply marvellous. Such a wonderful dining experience.
ychung77 (5 years ago)
Awesome place with stellar prep of fish dishes. The wine list is also very reasonable
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