Alahärmä Church

Kauhava, Finland

The grey stone church of Alahärmä is designed by Josef Stenbäck and built in the Neo-Gothic and national romanticism style. The church was built in 1901-1903 to replace the earlier one destroyed by fire in 1898.

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Details

Founded: 1901-1903
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tino Álvarez (2 years ago)
Preciosa iglesia luterana. Nombrada como la Iglesia de piedra más bonita de Finlandia. Hay un parking exterior. Está en el centro del pueblo. Preciosos cementerios. Justo en frente hay un museo del pueblo.
Tomi Tyni (2 years ago)
Poissa käytöstä peruskorjauksen takia 14.5.-30.9.2018.
Jari Sundman (2 years ago)
Alahärmän kirkko on keskikokoista isompi 1000 istumapaikkainen harmaakivikirkko. Rakennettu 1903 . Edellinen kirkko , puusta tehty paloi katon tervauksessa 1898 ja uusi rakennettiin harmaasta gneissistä joka louhittiin paikkakunnalta. Tyyliltään on se lähinnä sekoitus uusgoottisuutta sekä kansallisromantiikkaa. Alajärven kirkko äänestettiin Radio Dein äänestyksessä Suomen kauneimmaksi kirkoksi vuonna 2015, eikä varmaankaan aivan aiheetta.
Julius Uswametsa (2 years ago)
Hieno ainaski ulkoapäin ku en kerinny sisällä käydä.
Kaarina Kankaanpaa (3 years ago)
Kaunis kirkko ja erityisen hyvä äänentoisto.
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