Nurmo Church

Seinäjoki, Finland

There was originally a small chapel in Nurmo built in 1727. After couple of decades it became too small for increasing population. The chapter denied the building of new church, but local people started however to construct it illegally in 1777. The building master was Antti Hakola, but he accidentally drowned to Nurmo river in 1778. His son, Kaappo Hakola, continued the construction and the church completed in 1779.

The interior has been constructed mainly by Solomon Köhlström from Jalasjärvi. He carved doors, seats, windows and also probably the altar. The belfry was erected in already in 1770. The bells were made in Stockholm in 1766 and 1777.

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Details

Founded: 1777-1779
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Esko Taskinen (2 years ago)
A really warm-hearted church, the blessing was a great success. Warm memories.
Pentti Juhani Jormalainen (2 years ago)
Beautiful wood church
Kitta Hautasaari (2 years ago)
Beautiful church
Tapio Hovila (3 years ago)
A place to relax
Minja-Riina Kuikka (3 years ago)
The party agreed on too tight a schedule. Otherwise a very beautiful place.
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