There was originally a small chapel in Nurmo built in 1727. After couple of decades it became too small for increasing population. The chapter denied the building of new church, but local people started however to construct it illegally in 1777. The building master was Antti Hakola, but he accidentally drowned to Nurmo river in 1778. His son, Kaappo Hakola, continued the construction and the church completed in 1779.

The interior has been constructed mainly by Solomon Köhlström from Jalasjärvi. He carved doors, seats, windows and also probably the altar. The belfry was erected in already in 1770. The bells were made in Stockholm in 1766 and 1777.

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Details

Founded: 1777-1779
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mari Talvinen (2 years ago)
Kaunis kirkko kauniilla paikalla
Marko M (2 years ago)
Sisällä en ole käynyt, mutta ulkoisesti kirkko on aikalailla tavanomainen ristipuukirkko, joka rakennettu 1777-1779. Kirkkoa ei maalattu heti vaan vasta viisitoista vuotta valmistumisensa jälkeen vuonna 1793, jolloin ulkoseinät käsiteltiin tummahkolla punamultamaalilla. Nykyisen vaalean värinsä kirkko on saanut vuonna 1913. Ympäröivä hautausmaa on runsaan puustonsa ansiosta viihtyisä.
Jari Sundman (2 years ago)
Vanha ristikirkko 1700-luvun loppupuolelta. Hyvin säilynyt aikojen saatossa sekä ulkopuolelta että sisustuksen osalta alkuperäisyyttä kunnioittaen.
Kauno Saario (3 years ago)
Upea kirkko
Vesa Savolainen (3 years ago)
Karulla tavalla kaunis puukirkko. Hyvin hoidettu kirkkomaa. Suuret kuuset herättävät huomiota ja antavat paikalle ylevyyttä.
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