Provincial Museum of Southern Ostrobothnia

Seinäjoki, Finland

The provincial museum is located in the Östermyra ironworks and manor site. The ironworks was founded in 1798 and the manor house was built in 1806. The museum area consists several buildings and the main building is an old stone cowshed. The basic exhibitions present the life of agrarian communities, rural trade and handicraft skills, a countryside pharmacy and a gunpowder museum.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1798
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lauri Lassi (2 years ago)
Suosittelen vierailemaan museossa. Monipuoliset näyttelyt
Anita Metsälä (2 years ago)
Tutustumisen arvoinen, jos tykkää käydä museoissa, ainahan näkee jotain uuttaa ja oppii jotain lisää. Kannattaa samalla kävellä Törnävän hienossa miljöössä, katsoa Kartanoa ja joenrantaa...tunnelmallista ja rentouttavaa.
Riikka Ruut (2 years ago)
Mukava käydä tutustumassa vanhaan aikaan. Östermyra päivät.
Teemu Niemi (2 years ago)
Hyvä puistoalue, hieno miljöö.
Minna Laakso (3 years ago)
Great museum
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.