Castle Hoensbroek or Gebrookhoes is one of the largest castles in the Netherlands. This imposing watercastle is known as 'the most lordly stronghold between Rhine and Meuse'. The oldest part of the castle, notably the tall round tower, dates from around 1360, when it was built by Herman Hoen, though a predecessor to the castle had already existed in the swamp (or Gebrook) the castle was located in. This so-called motte-and-bailey dated from around 1225. In 1250 a fortified manor was built on the location of the present castle. Because of its important strategical location in the Duchy of Brabant, located along important trading routes to Maastricht, Aachen and Cologne, the castle was expanded in several phases, becoming the largest stronghold between the Meuse and the Rhine rivers. It contains at least 67 halls, rooms and living quarters.

The castle was the ancestral home of the knights Hoen van den Broeck, the Imperial baron Hoen van Hoensbroeck, and the Imperial counts and viscounts Van en tot Hoensbroeck for nearly six centuries. The family Van Hoensbroeck left the castle at the end of the 18th century, after which the castle entered a period of decay. Count Frans Lothar sold the castle in 1927 to the present day owners, the foundation 'Ave Rex Christe'. It was thoroughly restored between 1930 and 1940. During and shortly after the second world war, the castle and accompanying buildings were used for diverse ends. From 1951 to 1973 the writer-poet Bertus Aafjes lived in parts of the castle. In the period 1986-1989 another restoration took place. Since then it has formed a popular and educative museum destination, funded by the municipality.

Over the centuries the castle has received extensive rebuilding and expansion three times. The different architectural styles from the different centuries (14th, 17th and 18th) are easy to separate from each other. The complex is surrounded by a moat and has four wings situated around a rectangular courtyard. The main building is reachable over a bridge. The main building has two identical square towers with union-tops, flanking the entrance, and two taller half-separate corner towers of irregular shape at the backside. The forecastles are both U-formed and enclose two large inner courts.

From 1720 to 1722, Frans Arnold, Imperial count van Hoensbroek, had substantial reworking done, including the building of a new north-western wing. The interior, with its illusionistic ceiling paintings from the 18th century, shows French influence. The son of Frans Arnold, Lotharius Frans, was the last lord of Hoensbroeck (1759–1794) who resided in the castle, until 1787, just before the French revolution.

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Founded: 1360
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brenda Pierce (2 years ago)
My favorite place to sit and read This is a magical place full of history
Alexandra H. (3 years ago)
Nice castle, but the entrance fee is a bit too high (11€ per person)
Adrien Vanore (3 years ago)
Well preserved grounds and artifacts, as well as creative recreations. Extremely informative, changing exhibitions. Information is available in multiple languages. Large parking lot, friendly staff, small but serviceable cafe, family friendly with lots of activity for children and adults alike. Plan on spending a full day here!
Troy Henderson (3 years ago)
This is a very neat old castle. It isn’t furnished really well but the history is nice to read about. It wasn’t overly busy, so we were able to walk around without many interruptions. The highlight was the dungeon at the bottom of the tower.
H.Y. Huang (3 years ago)
very organized and well maintained castle. its a great place to take your children for a historical outing because they have very good balance of information and entertainment even for young kids. entrance fee is also very reasonable.
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