Centre Charlemagne

Aachen, Germany

Centre Charlemagne is the new museum of Aachen local history. It occupies the site on the Katschhof, the former palace courtyard. It focuses on a history of Aachen from the Neolithic to the present day. The key periods are the ancient Roman age (until 4th century AD), Charlemagne's Aachen (the capital of Frankish Empire), the medieval period and Baroque period. The whole house is barrier-free.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Katschhof 1, Aachen, Germany
See all sites in Aachen

Details

Founded: 2014
Category: Museums in Germany

More Information

www.centre-charlemagne.eu

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andre Theron (21 months ago)
Very interactive and child friendly. Enough information for the adult and enough to keep the smaller museum goes busy.
Carlo Sebellin (22 months ago)
Awesome place if you are interested in the history of Aachen. You can learn what happened from all the way back to the first settlements, or you can inmerse yourself in the recent history of the city! Definitely worth visiting, check the "six for six" ticket to visit other good museums in Aachen!
Carlos Spiritrunner (22 months ago)
Great history and charm in an amazing place...
jeroen brons (2 years ago)
Excellent museum with original depiction of Aachens rich 1200 year history
Aurel Ghioca (2 years ago)
Small exhibit about the history of Aachen. The audioguide is really comprehensive.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.