Kierikki Centre

Yli-Ii, Finland

The Kierikki Centre and the reconstructed Stone Age village, located on the banks of the river Iijoki, form a unique combination telling about Finnish prehistory. Ongoing excavations, an archaeological exhibition with finds dating up to 5,000 BC, and hands-on activities at the Stone Age Village enhance the fascinating view of how people lived in Stone Age Finland.

The architectural award-winning Kierikki main building is the largest log building in Scandinavia. It houses an archaeological exhibition, a well-equipped auditorium with film presentations, and a restaurant. The museum shop offers unique gifts and souvenirs.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 2001
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

More Information

www.museot.fi
www.ouka.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Milena Kostadinova (14 months ago)
Very good organised place. Me and my class has enjoyed a lot!
Leo Thai (15 months ago)
Nice
Petteri Hamalainen (16 months ago)
Stone age outdoors museum and an excavation site
Ilkka Ylitie (17 months ago)
- The route could be marked more clearly + Infoboards, live examples + Helpful, knowledgeable staff = An interesting dip into the stoneage and how life was then. So interesting and capturing (with the do-it-yourself checkpoints) that a "quick visit" easily extends to an 2-4 hour experience. Wheelchair accessible, children welcome. The walkway is in good condition and short enough (~1.5km?) for a 4+ year old child to walk it. You can try things such as spear throwing, archery, boating, jewelry making etc, all in the stone age fashion. There's visitable dwellings, trap examples and even an archaeology site you can visit & dig yourself. In short; Stoneage made interesting & fun for the whole family.
Johan Sl (3 years ago)
Not the best park for a authentic view.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Montparnasse Cemetery

Montparnasse Cemetery was created from three farms in 1824. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery.

Montparnasse cemetery is the burial place of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also many graves of foreigners who have made France their home, as well as monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris.

The cemetery is divided by Rue Émile Richard. The small section is usually referred to as the small cemetery (petit cimetière) and the large section as the big cemetery (grand cimetière).

Although Baudelaire is buried in this cemetery (division 6), there is also a cenotaph to him (between division 26 and 27). Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction.