Kierikki Centre

Yli-Ii, Finland

The Kierikki Centre and the reconstructed Stone Age village, located on the banks of the river Iijoki, form a unique combination telling about Finnish prehistory. Ongoing excavations, an archaeological exhibition with finds dating up to 5,000 BC, and hands-on activities at the Stone Age Village enhance the fascinating view of how people lived in Stone Age Finland.

The architectural award-winning Kierikki main building is the largest log building in Scandinavia. It houses an archaeological exhibition, a well-equipped auditorium with film presentations, and a restaurant. The museum shop offers unique gifts and souvenirs.

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Details

Founded: 2001
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

More Information

www.museot.fi
www.ouka.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Milena Kostadinova (4 months ago)
Very good organised place. Me and my class has enjoyed a lot!
Leo Thai (5 months ago)
Nice
Petteri Hamalainen (6 months ago)
Stone age outdoors museum and an excavation site
Ilkka Ylitie (7 months ago)
- The route could be marked more clearly + Infoboards, live examples + Helpful, knowledgeable staff = An interesting dip into the stoneage and how life was then. So interesting and capturing (with the do-it-yourself checkpoints) that a "quick visit" easily extends to an 2-4 hour experience. Wheelchair accessible, children welcome. The walkway is in good condition and short enough (~1.5km?) for a 4+ year old child to walk it. You can try things such as spear throwing, archery, boating, jewelry making etc, all in the stone age fashion. There's visitable dwellings, trap examples and even an archaeology site you can visit & dig yourself. In short; Stoneage made interesting & fun for the whole family.
Johan Sl (3 years ago)
Not the best park for a authentic view.
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