Museum of Northern Ostrobothnia

Oulu, Finland

The museum of Northern Ostrobothnia was established in 1896. The basic exhibition will tell you the history of the city of Oulu and its surroundings. Between the years 1911-1929 the museum operated in an old wooden villa Villa Ainola, which was destroyed in a fire on July 9th, 1929. Some of the collections of the museum were also destroyed. Soon after the fire the current museum building was started to be built on the site of the old villa. The new stone house was completed in 1931. The building was designed by a Finnish architect Oiva Kallio.

The basic exhibition extends in the all other floors of the building except the bottom floor, which is dedicated to the changing exhibitions and an exhibition for the children. The exhibition for the children is which is based on the Doghill books by Finnish children's author Mauri Kunnas. The ground floor hosts a large scale model of Oulu city centre in the year 1938 before the bombings of the World War II.

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Address

Ainolanpolku 1, Oulu, Finland
See all sites in Oulu

Details

Founded: 1896
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joel Castro (4 months ago)
Great overview about city and region hiatory. Amazing Staff
Jona Mac Intyre (10 months ago)
A 3-floor museum about Oulu history. Lot of information and worth visiting. The staff is very attentive. Free entrance.
Lori B (14 months ago)
A wonderful collection of items and historical information. Many of which are explained in English which was helpful for me. ?
Monika van Hoeve (3 years ago)
Situated in a pretty park. Interesting building. Very well executed displays. Clear explainations in English. A trip through Oulu history. I learned a lot.
Arsi Häggman (4 years ago)
Suprisingly kids enjoyed here much. Partly because of toy museum with activities and Doghill "Koiramäen lapset" exhibition.
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