Museum of Northern Ostrobothnia

Oulu, Finland

The museum of Northern Ostrobothnia was established in 1896. The basic exhibition will tell you the history of the city of Oulu and its surroundings. Between the years 1911-1929 the museum operated in an old wooden villa Villa Ainola, which was destroyed in a fire on July 9th, 1929. Some of the collections of the museum were also destroyed. Soon after the fire the current museum building was started to be built on the site of the old villa. The new stone house was completed in 1931. The building was designed by a Finnish architect Oiva Kallio.

The basic exhibition extends in the all other floors of the building except the bottom floor, which is dedicated to the changing exhibitions and an exhibition for the children. The exhibition for the children is which is based on the Doghill books by Finnish children's author Mauri Kunnas. The ground floor hosts a large scale model of Oulu city centre in the year 1938 before the bombings of the World War II.

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Address

Ainolanpolku 1, Oulu, Finland
See all sites in Oulu

Details

Founded: 1896
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arsi Häggman (2 months ago)
Suprisingly kids enjoyed here much. Partly because of toy museum with activities and Doghill "Koiramäen lapset" exhibition.
Adrian Agus Setiawan (8 months ago)
interesting facts about Oulu and Finland history, could use some renovations to attract kids and students0
dan ben (2 years ago)
Fantastic and fascinating museum. We really enjoyed our time here and learnt a lot about the local area and history
Alan Pembshaw (2 years ago)
An excellent cultural museum centring on Oulu and its surrounding area from the stone age to the present. Has a great model of Oulu in the mid 1930s when the city had only about 20000 people. If you have time to visit here, also go to the Art Museum on the other side of the park. Well worth a visit.
Bobsmei Bontilao (2 years ago)
A big exhibit of Finnish history of the region. From the stone age to the present. A view of the way of life of the region and hoe Oulu came to be. Truly an educational tour and a must visit for all history-loving tourist and locals alike.
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