Oulu Cathedral

Oulu, Finland

The Oulu Cathedral is an Evangelical Lutheran cathedral and the seat of the Diocese of Oulu. The church was built in 1777 as a tribute to the King of Sweden Gustav III of Sweden and named after his wife as Sofia Magdalena's church.

The wooden structures burned in the large fire of the city of Oulu in 1822. The church was built again on top of the old stonewalls with famous architect Carl Ludvig Engel as the designer. The restoration works were completed in 1832, but the belfry was not erected until 1845.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Address

Linnankatu 4, Oulu, Finland
See all sites in Oulu

Details

Founded: 1777 (restored 1832)
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tushar Mali (20 months ago)
Attended prayer here on Sunday. It was mind blowing experience
Tomaz Mrevlje (21 months ago)
Beautiful interior, calm and serene. Loved it.
Uffe Andersson (21 months ago)
One of the most beautiful and respected buildings in Oulu. Good place to visit, absolutely.
Martyna Binek (22 months ago)
The Cathedral of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland captivates with its architecture and simplicity of interior design. A great place for moments of meditation and peace.
George K. Sandor (2 years ago)
This beautiful cathedral is a must see if you are visiting Oulu. Take the time to see inside as it is beautifully maintained.
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