St. Nicholas Church is a large, cruciform town church set on Place Dalton at the heart of the lower town which clusters below the walls of the citadel. Due to the destruction of the French Revolution, WWI and WWII it is the most significant surviving medieval building in the town.

The church is first mentioned in 1208 as a foundation of the Abbey of Notre-Dame within the citadel, a relationship which existed into the 16th century. About this time, the silting up of one of the channels caused the centre of the town to move southwards, and St Nicholas took over from St Peter as the main town church.

The vaulted roofs in the nave and transepts were installed in the 17th century, but their weight caused the walls to crack, and as part of the rebuilding the nave was widened and lengthened, a response to the doubling in population of the lower town that century.

All the glass was destroyed during the liberation, and has so far been replaced in the lower stories with some splendid 1980s abstract designs.

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Details

Founded: 1208
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

www.simonknott.co.uk

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User Reviews

Gyula Horvath (19 months ago)
Ha erre jársz nyugodtan tevegyel be. A látvány kárpótol. Káprázatos alkotasok
Laurence Marcq (19 months ago)
Tous les jeudis de 16 à 17h pour un chapelet devant ste Rita.....
Ingrid BRONET (2 years ago)
Au pied de la Vieille Ville
Michel Tendron (2 years ago)
J aime frequenter les églises ou je passe
Christiane Lemaitre (2 years ago)
C'est l'église ou j'ai fais ma communion solennelle en 1959 très bon souvenir
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