Boulogne-sur-Mer Belfry

Boulogne-sur-Mer, France

The oldest monument of Boulogne-sur-Mer was built in three stages, in the 12th, 13th and 18th centuries. In fact, this belfry was originally a seigniorial prison, transferred to the community in 1230. 38 years later, Saint-Louis ordered the destruction of the tower’s second floor, as well as of the community’s charter of freedom and the town’s seal, as it was refusing to pay a tax on the eighth crusade. One year later, the town, its privileges restored, was able to rebuild the missing part. As for the last octagonal level, it was built in 1734, after the spire was burnt.

Today the belfry is one of 56 in northeastern France and Belgium with shared UNESCO World Heritage Site status and serves as the home to a museum of Celtic remains from the Roman occupation.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

A o (16 months ago)
Very nice view and good visit.
Jean-Claude T (21 months ago)
Simply beautiful, discovered during a group hike, very well maintained
Germain Blavier (3 years ago)
Delpierre Stephan (3 years ago)
Joris Van Damme (4 years ago)
Nice cityhall, worth the climb to the to of the 'beffroi', very cheap.
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