Calais Town Hall

Calais, France

One of Calais’ finest landmarks is the Town Hall (1911-25) whose clock towering belfry can be seen for miles around. This magnificent neo-Flemish-style structure built of brick and stone was finally completed in 1925 after being interrupted by The Great War. Its purpose was to commemorate the merging of the cities of Calais and Saint Pierre in 1885 on a piece of barren land between the two towns. Today it dominates the main square and can be visited by tourists. It houses paintings and is adorned with stained-glas windows telling the story of the departing English. The windows also act to diffuse the sunlight around the grand staircase. The interior is renowned for the elaborate décor of the reception rooms.

Attached to the town hall is an ornate brick clock tower and belfry that stands 74m high. It contains one of the most beautiful chimes in the north of France and is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Belfries of Belgium and France.

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Details

Founded: 1911-1925
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Diana Hernández (5 years ago)
Entrance is free. It's not that big but it's beautiful.
Mindaugas (5 years ago)
Very beatiful.
Julie Townshend (6 years ago)
Wonderful to see Rodans statues where they were intended to be and what faces
Ĝĭmmįćk4Ļįƒě (8 years ago)
This place is brilliant to see in Christmas its breathtaking and fantastic it's a WOW moment indeed.
justin tremblay (8 years ago)
Great view! However the guided visit is rubbish, expect un interested kids as guides..
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