Rolduc is the name of a medieval abbey in Kerkrade, which is now a Roman Catholic seminary and an affiliated conferencing center. In 1104, a young priest by the name of Ailbertus of Antoing founded an Augustinian abbey in the Land of Rode, near the river Wurm. The abbey was called Kloosterrade, which later became 's-Hertogenrade, after the ducal castle that was built across the Wurm. Ailbertus died in 1111 and his bones were later interred in the crypt. In 1136 the land of Rode, including the abbey, fell into the hands of the Duchy of Limburg. Kloosterrade was considered to be their family church. Several dukes of Limburg are buried at Rolduc, such as Walram III, whose cenotaph can be found in the nave of the church. During the 12th century and 13th century the abbey flourished. Several other communities were founded by Kloosterrade. In 1250 the abbey owned more than 3,000 hectares of land.

During the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries times were harder for the abbey in both spiritual and material terms. The buildings were heavily damaged during the Eighty Years War. Materialistically, the abbey began to prosper again in the late 17th century when revenue was generated from the exploitation of coal mines. In around 1775, Rolduc employed 350 mineworkers.

The abbey was dissolved by the French in 1796 and the buildings stood empty for 35 years. In 1815, when the Kingdom of the Netherlands was formed (see Vienna Congress), the border was drawn through the ancient land of Rode, separating the abbey from the castle. The eastern part (including the castle) became Prussian Herzogenrath and the western part (including the abbey) became part of the Dutch municipality of Kerkrade.

In the 19th century Rolduc became a famous boarding school run by Jesuits, and a seminary of the Diocese of Roermond. Many influential Dutch Roman Catholics were educated at Rolduc.

The 12th century abbey church is an example of Mosan art. The crypt and the choir and chancel above have a cloverleaf pattern. The interior of both the church and the crypt contains richly carved capitals. Remarkable is the fact that the columns in the crypt all have a different design. In 1853, the young architect Pierre Cuypers was commissioned to restore the crypt and to reinstate as much as possible the original Romanesque fabric.

The cloisters are largely 18th century. The abbey has a richly decorated Rococo library with an important collection of books. During the Middle Ages, the Rolduc library was one of the most famous libraries in the Meuse region. The history of the abbey was recorded in the so-called Annales Rodenses, a chronicle about the years between 1104-1157.

The interior painting above the altar is by the Nazarene movement painter Matthias Goebbels.

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Founded: 1104
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

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User Reviews

Florian Krüger (2 years ago)
Went there for a physics convention. Not really modern, but nice nonetheless. The hotel room I stayed in was quite nice, but the main selling point of this venue is without a doubt its beautiful historical charme. The staff was nice and the food was good as well.
Veit Batz (2 years ago)
Simple rooms at a nice price including a really good breakfast.
Christian Sadler (3 years ago)
Nice hotel. The location is great. The room was spacious, well furnished and very clean. Good breakfast. Our room was unheated at our arrival. Thats why i give 4/5 stars.
W F J Janssen (3 years ago)
This is truly a glorious facility. Also remember to visit their great Xmas craft market!
solus ito (3 years ago)
medieval atmosphere and evenings and nights in stillness Imagine yourself in a monks robe freshly ordained in an medieval abbey with the quietest forestry in immediate surroundings and hear at night the eerie sounds of owls hooting when you lie in bed with an open window still contemplating the restaurant where a friendly bartender served you a home brewed beer, already anticipating the break of the fast of the night's buffet next morrow.
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