The first owners of the Geldrop castle were Jan and Philip van Geldrop, who probably built it in 1350. The following century the castle remained in the Van Geldrop family. The construction of the present day castle was started in 1616, when Amandus I van Horne had the middle facade built. There is still a door post in the castle that reminds us of him. It holds the coats of arms of this illustrous family.

In 1768 the heirs of Van Horne sold the manor to Adriaan van Sprangh. The latter´s coat of arms is situated upon the western facade of the castle. The new Lord of Geldrop had the castle and living-tower renovated. In 1798 feudal rights ended with the French Revolution. The title of Lord of Geldrop was now an empty one.

In the 19th century the castle came into the hands of the Hoevenaar family. Under the ownership of Sara Hoevenaar, 1n 1840, the medieval living tower was demolished. During Hubertus Hoevenaar the castle got its present look. The gatelodge disappeared and became living quarters, a side building (where the terrace is now situated) disappeared and the sidewing was raised. A coat of arms that is fastened to the facade reminds us of Hubertus Hoevenaar. His daughter Arnaudina married baron Van Tuyll van Serooskerken. They lived in the castle permently from 1912. Two generations supplied councillors to the corporation of the municipality, which stresses the ties between Geldrop and its castle (from 1921 to 1938 and from 1945 to 1953).

Today the Geldrop castle is used for weddings, concerts and exhibitions. In the attic there is a small museum where lots of material is exhibited, given by the Geldrop people in the last 40 years.

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Founded: 1616
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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www.kasteelgeldrop.nl

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