The Valkhof is on a hill overlooking the river. It is the site of a former Charlemagne fortification and the surviving Carolingian elements are quite modest. There are two buildings with a Carolingian element. The first is an octogon chapel built in the style of Aachen in the 8th or 9th century. The initial building was constructed about 1000 and rebuilt about 1400. It used material from Charlemagne's fortification and we think we could identify some of these Caroilingian flat bricks. The second building is the ruin of Barbarossa's chapel that incorporated several Carolingian capitals on Roman pilars in the chapel.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: c. 1000 AD
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robbert Gommans (2 years ago)
One of the more famous Nijmegen Museums, focuses on art and historical findings. Has very interesting changing collections sometimes. Especially interesting to find out more about the (Roman) history of the city.
Simon (2 years ago)
Really nice local museum. Beautiful light modern architecture. They have some stuff about the Roman history of the city, some medieval things, some temporary exhibitions, and something cool for children. The descriptions are mostly in Dutch and German. They serve proper espresso. The people working there were very friendly.
2dkayak (2 years ago)
Order of the display could improve to accommodate the large number of people visiting the Maria van Gelre exhibit.
Mariska Groen (3 years ago)
Lovely bright museum showing the exhibition ‘Maria van Gelre’, a surprising insight in 1400s government, church connected by art, guided by the prayerbook of an extraordinary powerful woman. Parking garage next door and easy to be combined with a town visit
Hans Pille (3 years ago)
Amazing special exhibitions. The Maria van Gelre prayer book (end 2018) is excellent.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Bamberg Historic City Centre

Bamberg is located in Upper Franconia on the river Regnitz close to its confluence with the river Main. Its historic city center is a listed UNESCO world heritage site.

Bamberg is a good example of a central European town with a basically early medieval plan and many surviving ecclesiastical and secular buildings of the medieval period. When Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, became King of Germany in 1007 he made Bamberg the seat of a bishopric, intended to become a 'second Rome'. Of particular interest is the way in which the present town illustrates the link between agriculture (market gardens and vineyards) and the urban distribution centre.

From the 10th century onwards, Bamberg became an important link with the Slav peoples, especially those of Poland and Pomerania. During its period of greatest prosperity, from the 12th century onwards, the architecture of this town strongly influenced northern Germany and Hungary. In the late 18th century Bamberg was the centre of the Enlightenment in southern Germany, with eminent philosophers and writers such as Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and E.T.A. Hoffmann living there.

Bamberg extends over seven hills, each crowned by a beautiful church. This has led to Bamberg being called the 'Franconian Rome'.