The Valkhof is on a hill overlooking the river. It is the site of a former Charlemagne fortification and the surviving Carolingian elements are quite modest. There are two buildings with a Carolingian element. The first is an octogon chapel built in the style of Aachen in the 8th or 9th century. The initial building was constructed about 1000 and rebuilt about 1400. It used material from Charlemagne's fortification and we think we could identify some of these Caroilingian flat bricks. The second building is the ruin of Barbarossa's chapel that incorporated several Carolingian capitals on Roman pilars in the chapel.

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Founded: c. 1000 AD
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robbert Gommans (17 months ago)
One of the more famous Nijmegen Museums, focuses on art and historical findings. Has very interesting changing collections sometimes. Especially interesting to find out more about the (Roman) history of the city.
Simon (18 months ago)
Really nice local museum. Beautiful light modern architecture. They have some stuff about the Roman history of the city, some medieval things, some temporary exhibitions, and something cool for children. The descriptions are mostly in Dutch and German. They serve proper espresso. The people working there were very friendly.
2dkayak (18 months ago)
Order of the display could improve to accommodate the large number of people visiting the Maria van Gelre exhibit.
Mariska Groen (2 years ago)
Lovely bright museum showing the exhibition ‘Maria van Gelre’, a surprising insight in 1400s government, church connected by art, guided by the prayerbook of an extraordinary powerful woman. Parking garage next door and easy to be combined with a town visit
Hans Pille (2 years ago)
Amazing special exhibitions. The Maria van Gelre prayer book (end 2018) is excellent.
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