St. Quentin Cathedral

Hasselt, Belgium

St. Quentin Cathedral in Hasselt was granted to a cathedral in 1967, but its construction began already in the 11th century. The first church was built inthe 8th century and rebuilt in Romanesque style in the 11th century. The cathedral construction continued several centuries. In the 15th century the choir was rebuilt. During the iconoclasm the tabernacle and statues, the altar lateral and the main altar were destroyed. The tower of the present church dates from 1725; it was restored in the 19th century.

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Address

Vismarkt 5, Hasselt, Belgium
See all sites in Hasselt

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adriatic sea (2 years ago)
Nice place to visit.
MatusHarky (2 years ago)
Hasselt is highly recommended city to visit. It's not biggest but very nice atmosphere, like in Netherlands. Clean and nice. Restaurants, tourism.
Ang. Ony (3 years ago)
One nice place to find God and to find the beast version of you...
Marc Jacobs (3 years ago)
One of my absolute favorites. Amazing mix of styles, impressive organ. Top landmark in Hasselt, surviving in a once cosy town centre increasingly covered by out if proportion concrete building projects.
Alain LARNO (3 years ago)
Beautifull Cathedral, very well maintend
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