Tingelstad Old Church

Gran, Norway

Tingelstad Old Church is a Romanesque stone church in Gran. Dendrochronological dating shows that parts of the timber within the church were felled between 1219-1220. The original name for this church was 'St. Petri Church', although presently it is called Tingelstad old church (Tingelstad gamle kirke) as it was replaced by a new church in 1866.

The congregation also had a stave church (Grindaker stave church), but this was demolished in 1866, again because it was too small.

The spire on the wooden belfry bears a copy of a 12th-century weather vane. The original vane is held in the Museum of Cultural History in Oslo. It is believed that it was once fitted to the bow of a warship. Although the church contains a few other original, medieval features such as a wooden crucifix and a stone altar, it is best known for its intact interior from the 16th and 17th centuries. The pulpit is from 1579 and is one of Norway's oldest. An altar frontal from 1699 can also be found in the church. A unique mural from 1632 depicting the Dano-Norwegian coat of arms, has been partially revealed on the interior North wall.

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Address

Kongevegen 88, Gran, Norway
See all sites in Gran

Details

Founded: c. 1219
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nitin Francis (3 years ago)
Peaceful place
-alf erik- Svensbraaten (3 years ago)
Flott kirke fra 1800-tallet.
Inger Finsrud (3 years ago)
Fantastisk kirke og konsert ❤️❤️
Jarle Stangjordet (4 years ago)
Thomas Ødegård (6 years ago)
Fin kirke fra 1865
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