Bojnice castle is a neo-Romantic castle with some original Gothic and Renaissance elements built in the 12th century. Bojnice Castle is one of the most visited castles in Slovakia, receiving hundreds of thousands of visitors every year and also being a popular filming stage for fantasy and fairy-tale movies.

Bojnice Castle was first mentioned in written records in 1113, in a document held at the Zobor Abbey. Originally built as a wooden fort, it was gradually replaced by stone, with the outer walls being shaped according to the uneven rocky terrain. Its first owner was Matthew III Csák, who received it in 1302 from the King Ladislaus V of Hungary. Later, in the 15th century, it was owned by King Matthias Corvinus, who gave it to his illegitimate son John Corvinus in 1489.

The Thurzós, the richest family in the northern Kingdom of Hungary, acquired the castle in 1528 and undertook its major reconstruction. The former fortress was turned into a Renaissance castle. From 1646 on, the castle"s owners were the Pálffys, who continued to rebuild the castle.

Finally, the last famous castle owner from the Pálffy family, Count János Ferenc Pálffy (1829-1908), made a complex romantic reconstruction from 1888 to 1910 and created today"s beautiful imitation of French castles of the Loire valley. He not only had the castle built, but also was the architect and graphic designer. He utilized his fine artistic taste and love for collecting pieces of art. He was one of the greatest collectors of antiques, tapestries, drawings, paintings and sculptures of his time. After his death and long quarrels, his heirs sold many precious pieces of art from the castle and then, in 1939, sold the castle, the health spa, and the surrounding land to Ján Ba»a.

After 1945, when Bata"s property was confiscated by the Czechoslovak government, the castle became the seat of several state institutions. On 9 May 1950, a huge fire broke out in the castle, but it was rebuilt at government expense. After this reconstruction, a museum specializing in the documentation and presentation of the era of architectural neo-styles was opened here. Bojnice Museum is now part of the Slovak National Museum today.

Bojnice Castle is surrounded by the castle park featuring numerous species of trees. The park also contains the Bojnice Zoo, the oldest and one of the most visited zoos in Slovakia. The castle park continues in the form of a forest park in the Strážov Mountains. There is also 'The Linden Tree of King Matthias', approximately 700 years old, one of the oldest documented trees in Slovakia.

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Founded: c. 1113
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Muhtady Abuamria (22 months ago)
Very good place to have couple of photos there, I had my wedding photo session there and the view with the castle is really stunning. All what you need is just a good cameraman and all will be fantastic. I will visit it again next time I have vacation. Highly recommended.
Tomas Minarik (22 months ago)
Bojnice castle is a great place to visit. Single traveler or family can find things to do here. We took the tour of the castle and after about 90min we enjoyed the falconers performance in the castle grounds.
Ainars Dominiks (23 months ago)
I was inside this nice castle. Just a little walk and you are at the main gates. The door was closed but there is reason. You can visit this castle in groups. if you are traveling solo then you will need to join some group to have access. Make sure you join group what speaks your language or you understand them. I was lucky and Had my private guide.
Sarath Babu (23 months ago)
Totally a nostalgic feeling. The guide precisely explained everything about the history. Ticket is cheap and you have to pay for using your camera.
Stanislava Klimkova (23 months ago)
Stunning place I have never seen better castle in my life . This place is in my heart because as small child I could visit this place only during summer holidays that’s why is so special . But is just something special in this castle it has some magic. Highly recommend to visit this place . You will not regret it
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