Bojnice castle is a neo-Romantic castle with some original Gothic and Renaissance elements built in the 12th century. Bojnice Castle is one of the most visited castles in Slovakia, receiving hundreds of thousands of visitors every year and also being a popular filming stage for fantasy and fairy-tale movies.

Bojnice Castle was first mentioned in written records in 1113, in a document held at the Zobor Abbey. Originally built as a wooden fort, it was gradually replaced by stone, with the outer walls being shaped according to the uneven rocky terrain. Its first owner was Matthew III Csák, who received it in 1302 from the King Ladislaus V of Hungary. Later, in the 15th century, it was owned by King Matthias Corvinus, who gave it to his illegitimate son John Corvinus in 1489.

The Thurzós, the richest family in the northern Kingdom of Hungary, acquired the castle in 1528 and undertook its major reconstruction. The former fortress was turned into a Renaissance castle. From 1646 on, the castle"s owners were the Pálffys, who continued to rebuild the castle.

Finally, the last famous castle owner from the Pálffy family, Count János Ferenc Pálffy (1829-1908), made a complex romantic reconstruction from 1888 to 1910 and created today"s beautiful imitation of French castles of the Loire valley. He not only had the castle built, but also was the architect and graphic designer. He utilized his fine artistic taste and love for collecting pieces of art. He was one of the greatest collectors of antiques, tapestries, drawings, paintings and sculptures of his time. After his death and long quarrels, his heirs sold many precious pieces of art from the castle and then, in 1939, sold the castle, the health spa, and the surrounding land to Ján Ba»a.

After 1945, when Bata"s property was confiscated by the Czechoslovak government, the castle became the seat of several state institutions. On 9 May 1950, a huge fire broke out in the castle, but it was rebuilt at government expense. After this reconstruction, a museum specializing in the documentation and presentation of the era of architectural neo-styles was opened here. Bojnice Museum is now part of the Slovak National Museum today.

Bojnice Castle is surrounded by the castle park featuring numerous species of trees. The park also contains the Bojnice Zoo, the oldest and one of the most visited zoos in Slovakia. The castle park continues in the form of a forest park in the Strážov Mountains. There is also 'The Linden Tree of King Matthias', approximately 700 years old, one of the oldest documented trees in Slovakia.

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Details

Founded: c. 1113
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lizaveta Myshko (5 months ago)
Haven't been inside, but the outer impressed! Must visit in Slovakia.
Thivanka De Silva (6 months ago)
An awesome castle straight out of Disney. We were super lucky to have an English tour guide and it was really quiet because of COVID. It’s definitely worth a look and going inside. The small town around it is really cute too. A half day or full day is all you probably need and the castle took us maybe just under 2 hours to walk through pretty slowly. Paying extra for the gallery is totally up to you. If you like art it may be worth it. Just seeing the main castle parts is probably enough for most.
Naveen “CatchMEIFUCAN” P (7 months ago)
What to say about this castle.. it is fairytale like castle. Bojnice town itself is cute and the castle and zoo are must see while you are there. Castle has amazing architecture and all the rooms inside the castle are open for the public. We can take some of the stunning photos of the castle from each and every direction. The castle is well preserved and maintained. This castle is number 1 in the Slovak Republic. It’s quite easy to get to this castle and it’s a perfect trip for a weekend. There are a few hotels around and the closest city (Prievidza) is 5 mins away from Bojnice.
Frank (7 months ago)
The castle itself is very nice, but you have to wait a long time to enter and inside there is almost no English descriptions. The prices are quite high, especially the parking is a rip off (12€ for 2h30)
Dovile Daugelaite (8 months ago)
Such a stunning castle with so much to see. The outside area is gorgeous too. Definitely recommend!
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