The Roman Catholic Church of St. Catherine was built in the years 1488-91 in late Gothic style. Its nave is topped by a star-shaped vault. The crypts below the church contain burial places of prominent citizens and vogts of the town. The surviving original Gothic inventory includes a stone baptismal font, a 15th-century cross, and a late Gothic sculpture of the Virgin Mary. The organ is from the end of the 18th century.

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Founded: 1488-1491
Category: Religious sites in Slovakia

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tim Husain (4 months ago)
Beautiful old church, unfortunately couldn't go inside, but it's beautiful from the outside and visible from all over the town.
Vladimir Balaz (10 months ago)
The nicest and most valuable church in the Old Town. You may note some fine well-preserved Gothic statues, including beautiful baptistery and angels supporting the church vaults.
Mariet Espinal (2 years ago)
The church of st. Catherine of Alexandria 1491, Is a trip to the past full of history and art. But I think they can have in better conditions. Banska Štiavnica, is a lovely town so romantic with a warm life. I love it
Mariet Espinal (2 years ago)
The church of st. Catherine of Alexandria 1491, Is a trip to the past full of history and art. But I think they can have in better conditions. Banska Štiavnica, is a lovely town so romantic with a warm life. I love it ?
Zuzana Paukova (2 years ago)
Beautiful architecture
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