Lietava Castle Ruins

Lietava, Slovakia

Lietava Castle was built after 1241, most likely as an administrative and military centre. In the early 14th century, it is mentioned with Máté Csák III, one of the powerful magnates in the Kingdom of Hungary. The castle changed hands until the 16th century when the Thurzó family gained it. It was reconstructed and fortified, and given its own military garrison. After the death of Imre Thurzó in 1621, it was divided between his heirs. After the ownership disputes in 1641, they lost interest in it. The castle report in 1698 said that the castle was uninhabited and there was only an archive, which was moved to the Orava Castle in the 1760s. After that, the castle was abandoned and not used any more.

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Lietava, Slovakia
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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jozef Dikoš (3 years ago)
Easy walking,wonderful view
Richard Kollar (3 years ago)
Nice, well maintained historical place with exposition that you can touch. + bar inside
Dinna Mag (3 years ago)
destroyed natural castle , we enjoyed the day in nice weather and mini cafeteria. also goats family :) good enough to track all the way up woth kids :)
Ivan Staffen (3 years ago)
Nice destination for a short walk. Under reconstruction, but still a lot things to see.
Juraj Tilesch (3 years ago)
Great place to visit, but it's poorly marked. Use the car park at the bottom in Majer and than follow the blue tourist sign.
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