The Wooden articular church in Kežmarok was built by the local Lutherans during a period of religious persecution, when they were allowed to erect only wooden churches. That is why even nails were made exclusively of wood. The construction was financially supported by Protestants from various countries, including Sweden and Denmark.

The only stone part of the church is its sacristy, originally built in 1593 as a pub outside the city walls. In the 17th century, the Roman Catholic dynasty of Habsburgs persecuted Protestantism in the Habsburg Monarchy, which included territory of present Slovakia at that time. The number of churches was limited to one in each free royal town, Kežmarok being one of them. The construction material had to be the cheapest possible (wood at that time) and a church had to be completed in 365 days. Furthermore, the site of a new Protestant church had to be chosen by a royal commission. In Kežmarok, a royal commission deliberately chose an ancient pub as a place of worship, in order to humiliate the local Protestant community. The pub was subsequently incorporated into a hastily constructed religious building as a sacristy.

The oldest parts are an epitaph from 1688 and a Renaissance baptistery from 1690. They are the only remaining parts of the first church. The second wooden church, erected in the Baroque style in 1717, completely replaced the first building. It has the shape of an equal-armed Greek cross. The space can accommodate 1,541 worshipers. According to a legend, circular windows were made by Swedish sailors contributing to the construction. The organ, completed in 1729, is known for its perfect sound despite having only wooden pipes.

The church is one of only five Lutheran wooden churches remaining in Slovakia. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Wooden Churches of the Slovak part of the Carpathian Mountain Area.

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Founded: 1593/1717
Category: Religious sites in Slovakia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dusan Babel (7 months ago)
Very interesting and quite unusual architecture for the area . Also worth to see beautiful old wooden church next to this one and old town just walking distance from church.
Matt Pierson (18 months ago)
Far from the coolest one, most of the wood is covered. If you're driving through... Sure. Don't make a special trip for it though.
ricardo muro plaza (2 years ago)
An absolutely waste of time. It should be a free entrance, but pay for that is a joke.
Nikita George (2 years ago)
Absolutely beautiful church, but we were only allowed to go 2-3 meters in, and only for a few minutes. The woman didn't speak English, so we never understood why.
Matěj Podaný (Matthew Podany) (2 years ago)
Great sight with a possibility of an examination. Cheap entrance fee to both castles on one ticket (3€/1,50€ adult/kid). Parking is right in front of the building (4€ per hour). Big capacity but expensive. I can recommend.
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