Ľubovňa Castle was built after 1292 by the Hungarian King Andrew III. As a border guard castle, it protected trade routes to Poland. Famous Hungarian and Polish noble families entered its history. The castle was the seat of the Polish trustees from the Spiš region for more than 350 years. Hungarian and Polish Kings and Queens, such as Mary, Sigismund, Vladislav II Jagiełło, John Albrecht, John Casimir, John Sobieski, honored the castle by their visit. Between 1655 and 1661 Polish crown jewels were hidden in the castle. Today their replicas - crown, apple, scepter and coronation mantle of Stanislaw August Poniatowski are exposed in the castle chapel. Famous adventurer Moric Beňovský who eventually became the king of Madagascar got to know the castle prison in 1768. One of the most valuable objects of the castle is definitely the main castle tower (Nebojsa) which has been preserved since the medieval era. There is an outlook tower with 360 degree view of the surroundings on the sixth floor. Just below the castle there is a unique natural museum that is definitely worth visiting.

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Founded: c. 1292
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stevko Robert (9 months ago)
Its a cool place for learning a little from the past. Has a lot of amaizing architecture, art and historical information.
Bea Beata (9 months ago)
Great value. !!! Best castle i have seen for a long time. And only 6 euros. Great show of falcons. Plus vintage village reconstructed. Just lovely!!!
Martin Kokavec (9 months ago)
Excellent place to visit! I recommend this place for families and school trips. I enjoyed it all.
Ramunė Vaičiulytė (11 months ago)
Built in XIII c. and rebuilt in XVI c. after fire. For Lithuanians and Polish people rebuilt of the castle is very important, because it was founded by Lithuanian grand duke and Polish king Sigismund the Augustus. After it belonged to some noble familes, who were very influent to Lithuanian country policy. But even if you do not know history, here you will enjoy to see some hunting birds and will be inspired by local guides! They look good and they do their job with love and passion! Few hours here will fly as just one moment and even you will not be tired after! :)
Oliviu Corea (11 months ago)
Great place to visit. Administrationngave in the past years a lot of attention and results are visible. Many areas of the fortress was renovated and given access to public. Plenty things to see for each member of family from age 3 to 99.
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