The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.

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User Reviews

Dave Harper (6 months ago)
great place, not the biggest castle but it is easy accessible even with small kids (not good for strollers). entry fees are reasonable, everything is nicely marked, you can pay by card, you won't get lost anywhere. toilette's are nice. all is working as should. the views from every window, corner or wall is astonishing don't miss any. highly recommend.
Filip Med (6 months ago)
Liked the way they are taking care of this place. Some parts are renovated and there are also some new buildings built (exhibition rooms, stage, toilets). The walk up is short - about 10 minutes from the parking. The entrance is 4,50 € and you can pay by card ? There are also souvenir shops and refreshments. Recommend :)
Andrej Holubek (6 months ago)
Great place to go with children. There is a Markt every weekend. Also the surrounding is wonderful.
viktor kolar (8 months ago)
It was closed but surrounding nature gave us a nice view.
Piotr (16 months ago)
Really nice place for short rest during longer trip. Quite interesting, not too expensive. Additionally I get information about castle in polish.
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