Trenèín Castle is relatively large renovated castle, towering on a steep limestone cliff directly above the city of Trenèín. It is a dominant feature not only of Trenèín, but also of the entire Považie region. The castle is a national monument.

History of the castle cliff dates back to the Roman Empire, what is proved by the inscription on the castle cliff proclaiming the victory of Roman legion against Germans in the year 179.

Today’s castle was probably built on the hill-fort. The first proven building on the hill was the Great Moravian rotunda from the 9th century and later there was a stone residential tower, which served to protect the Kingdom of Hungary and the western border. In the late 13th century the castle became a property of Palatine Matúš Csák, who became Mr. of Váh and Tatras.

Matúš Csák of Trenèín built a tower, still known as Matthew’s, which is a dominant determinant of the whole building. Another owner of the castle, Sigismund of Luxemburg, built a new palace and a chapel in the 15th century. All these buildings have been restored and are now used for museum purposes.

The 15th century was the century of fortification reinforcement, caused byHussite ventures, which directed to Slovakia. In the late 15th century, the castle together with the entire town belonged to Stephen Zápoµský, who began extensive alterations.

Trenèín Castle, together with the Spiš Castle and Devín Castle, belonged to the largest European castles in 1540-1560. At that time a star-defense artillery was built and modernized in accordance with historical patterns. The silhouette of the castle has changed – tall Gothic roofs were exchanged for horizontal Renaissance attics with swallow-tails, which were typical Italian elements of the 16th century. The castle was damaged during a fire in 1790. Nowadays, the castle is under a complex reconstruction. Restored objects are progressively used for museum purposes and for exposures.

A unique view offers from the Matthew’s tower. It offers an open view to the White Carpathian Mountains. Spaces of the Matthew’s tower document the housing of the nobility in the mid of the 11th century. Barbora’s palace interior and the cannon bastion have a modern renovated vault system.

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Details

Founded: 800-900 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stefano Sina (13 months ago)
Very nice Castel. The tour inside is nice. You need about 2 hour for the tour
Oleksiy Starykov (13 months ago)
Very big interesting castle but very boring tour, because inside there are only naked walls with some paintings on them. It is enough to visit the court and the tower.
Katarina Rosinova (14 months ago)
A must see if you are in the area. The castle belongs to the most beautiful ones in Slovakia and the view from the main tower is something to experience for sure. The castle is accessible with a pleasant walk from the city center and the opening hours are very tourist friendly (longer than usual 17:00). The staff working at the office and on the castle grounds is very kind and helpful.
Tobias Tatar (Fury) (14 months ago)
The castle has spectacular view! We got a good tour guy who was telling us everything about this castle. The castle itself is big. The tour took us about 1:30-2:00. You can decide if you want a long tour like we had or you can have short tour. The long tour will show you almost everything both inside and outside the castle. If you will choose the short tour, majority of time you will be outside.
Lubica Vysna (15 months ago)
I haven't been on this castle since my childhood. I was really impressed by the reconstructions they did during the years. Castle is in a great shape and offers interesting views. In comparison with some other castles, there is a lack of exhibits inside, but still it's worth to visit. It's really beautiful castle. Recommended!
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