Trenèín Castle is relatively large renovated castle, towering on a steep limestone cliff directly above the city of Trenèín. It is a dominant feature not only of Trenèín, but also of the entire Považie region. The castle is a national monument.

History of the castle cliff dates back to the Roman Empire, what is proved by the inscription on the castle cliff proclaiming the victory of Roman legion against Germans in the year 179.

Today’s castle was probably built on the hill-fort. The first proven building on the hill was the Great Moravian rotunda from the 9th century and later there was a stone residential tower, which served to protect the Kingdom of Hungary and the western border. In the late 13th century the castle became a property of Palatine Matúš Csák, who became Mr. of Váh and Tatras.

Matúš Csák of Trenèín built a tower, still known as Matthew’s, which is a dominant determinant of the whole building. Another owner of the castle, Sigismund of Luxemburg, built a new palace and a chapel in the 15th century. All these buildings have been restored and are now used for museum purposes.

The 15th century was the century of fortification reinforcement, caused byHussite ventures, which directed to Slovakia. In the late 15th century, the castle together with the entire town belonged to Stephen Zápoµský, who began extensive alterations.

Trenèín Castle, together with the Spiš Castle and Devín Castle, belonged to the largest European castles in 1540-1560. At that time a star-defense artillery was built and modernized in accordance with historical patterns. The silhouette of the castle has changed – tall Gothic roofs were exchanged for horizontal Renaissance attics with swallow-tails, which were typical Italian elements of the 16th century. The castle was damaged during a fire in 1790. Nowadays, the castle is under a complex reconstruction. Restored objects are progressively used for museum purposes and for exposures.

A unique view offers from the Matthew’s tower. It offers an open view to the White Carpathian Mountains. Spaces of the Matthew’s tower document the housing of the nobility in the mid of the 11th century. Barbora’s palace interior and the cannon bastion have a modern renovated vault system.

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Details

Founded: 800-900 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrea Luxlady (2 months ago)
Beautiful castle opened all year round with three different tours
Ainars Dominiks (3 months ago)
Another Castle with beautiful views and amazing history. It is not possible to pass it just like nothing is happening. Magnificent and full of surprises.
Francesco G. (4 months ago)
Very nice castle for very good price (5 Euro per person for Itinerary without guide) Must see it if you spend few hours in Town
Vladimir Balusik (5 months ago)
I really like this castle. I have been there few times and I’ll come back again. I recommend you visit the castle out of the peak season. You can have whole castle just for you and if you visit in the evening close to the closing time, you can see beautiful sunset as a bonus.
John B (6 months ago)
Amazing views at sunset in mid October. A lot of steps to climb in the tower and quite narrow so be prepared and give yourself plenty time if you are not fit. Good facilities and information about the place. Cheap tour guides available if you prefer. I would definitely come back if I got the chance!
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