Cervený Klástor Monastery

Cervený Klástor, Slovakia

Červený Kláštor (Red Monastery) was founded in the early 14th century, during the Hungarian Kingdom. Court documents from 1307 state that a man by the name of master Kokoš from Brezovica, founded six monasteries as a punishment for murder. In 1319 he donated 62 sectors of his village, Lechnice to the Carthusian order. A wooden structure was built in 1330, which was later replaced by bricks and stones. The monastery gets the name 'Red' from the red tiles that were used on the roofs.

The monastery suffered several quarrels with Czorsztyn lords, and was occupied by Hussites in 1431 and in 1433. It was adversely hit by the Battle of Mohács in 1515, and in 1545 Czorsztyn Knights from Niedzica Castle attacked the monastery, and the monks fled across the Dunajec River into Poland. The monastery was abolished during the Reformation in 1563, becoming a private residence for wealthy noblemen.

In 1699, Ladislav Maťašovský, a bishop in Nitra, purchased the monastery, and donated to the Camaldolese order, who settled down it this area in 1711. In 1782 it was secularized as part of Emperor Joseph II's campaign against monastic orders that in his view didn't pursue useful activities. The monastery’s library was sold to Budapest, and the church equipment to Muszyna, Poland.

In 1820 the Emperor Franz Joseph I donated the monastery to the newly founded Greek-Catholic diocese of Prešov.

The monastery suffered a fire in 1907 and was heavily damaged during the Second World War, but after being rebuilt in 1956–66 it was opened again and serves as a museum.

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Details

Founded: c. 1307
Category: Religious sites in Slovakia

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Grzegorz Na Szlaku (8 months ago)
Awesome if you love cycling get a bike and ride from Szczawnica to the Red Monastery. The road is easy and cyclists of all levels can enjoy it.
Lukas Jaromin (9 months ago)
Very nice and calm place. Great views on the "Three Crowns".
Marco Casamassima (2 years ago)
Very beautiful, I suggest to get a guided tour ? The guide told us a lot of interesting things
4K Side - Creo Tutorials (2 years ago)
Great place to stay for a while and breathe the history, thank you.
Lena Pustay (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to be and see.Much to do there with children if they are fond of water and cycling of course.Well spread infrastructure with a short pedestrian bridge to take you over the river right to Poland.Beautiful!
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