The younger manor house in Budimír with a strikingly smart Rococo architecture is set in a cared after French garden and English park. The manor is the Classicist Theresian structure from the second third of the 18th century. It was later adapted. Originally it was the residence of the noble family Ujházy. The rooms have splendid domes and a wall paintings have survived in what was once a representative room.

The buildings stands in park fenced in the Classicist style. Today it temporarily shelters exhibition of the Slovak Technical Museum, dedicated to history of time measuring and clockworks. Small exhibitions concerning history of technology and history of artare also installed there from time to time.

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Budimír, Slovakia
See all sites in Budimír

Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Slovakia

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slovakia.travel

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dominik Olsavsky (2 years ago)
repaired municipal office, I have at least partially harmonized opening hours with municipal office
Vladimir Mako (4 years ago)
Zrekonštruovaná budova obecného úradu.
Vladimir Mako (4 years ago)
Reconstructed building of the General Office.
Real MaMan adventures (5 years ago)
Jozef Halac (6 years ago)
Malebná dedinka, krásne upravené chodníky. Čarovne vyzdobená na Vianoce .
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