Boldogkő Castle towers above the village atop a north-south elongated and irregularly oval-shaped andesite mountain top. The exact time of its construction is unknown, but it is certain that it was built after the Mongol invasion in the mid-13th century. The stronghold, designed with an interior turret, defended the road to Košice and the Hernad Valley. Presently, the castle is in the hands of the local municipality.

A new major renovation and excavation effort began in 2002. The castle’s profile changed dramatically with the reconstruction of two towers (a gate tower and a southern tower). Moreover, a 100 m walkway was constructed running along the internal courtyard, offering splendid views through the arrow slits to the north and west, and over the ramparts. Another walkway was built along the knife-edge ridge of the so-called “Lion’s Rock,” leading to a magnificent lookout platform.

The two-story fortress palace was a concrete slab-reinforced flat-roofed building. In order to be better able to utilise the space, a higher roof was integrated during renovations. The large and stately knight’s hall is the result. The wing also houses an exhibition of thousands of tin/lead soldiers and their meticulously detailed dioramas depicting the most important battles in Hungarian history. The scenes can even be utilised to teach history during class tips. This exhibition is the largest of its kind in Central Europe.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Hungary

More Information

www.anp.hu
gotohungary.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pavel Pluhacek (15 months ago)
Really nice castle, rather smaller but all places are accessible with several really nice expositions. The place definitely has its incredible genius loci.
Balazs Zentai (2 years ago)
Rests in a wonderful location, overviewing all of its surrounding plains and hills. Interesting tin soldier museum in the attic.
Tamás Mihályi (2 years ago)
I love this place. Very nice atmosphere.very good with kids. Gorgeous view.
Amanda Robertson (2 years ago)
Food was amazing. And the view is something to see. Don't take my word for it, you must see it for yourself!! 5 stars isn't enough for this place.
Diaz Chairullah (2 years ago)
Far away from central but worth to visit. Very authentic, spacious surrounding of nature and the best part is not many tourists reach here haha! List it if you like adventure and culture trip.
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