Cabrad Castle Ruins

Čabradský Vrbovok, Slovakia

Čabraď Castle is first mentioned in 1276. Then it also went by the name Litava Castle, due to its position on top of the Litava Valley and its river (with a dominating position). It along with other (sentry) castles were built to protect the roads that were going through the area to the central Slovakian mines that were booming at the time. The castle was the residence of the Ders of Hunt-Poznan who are noted as being in the area from 1256.

In the 14th Century the castle is recorded as becoming the residence of Mathias Csák, around 1342 the castle began to be expanded into a more suitable fortification than it was. Some time later Cabrad was conquered and taken over by Jan Jiskra of Brandys, who was marching with his Hussite forces. Matthias Corvinus came and claimed the castle in 1462.

In the early part of the 16th Century Cardinal Tamás Bakócz took over the castle and invested in its refurbishment and further expansions, he was one of the richest men in Hungary and the country's highest clerical official. All the work took place around 1520. Peter Bakoc his nephew, inherited the castle after his uncles passing—along with his wealth, after Bakoc, his sister and brother-in-law took over the residence.

In 1547 the castle was taken seized by the knight Melichar Balassa and his bandit retinue, until the king forced him out a year later in 1548.

Around 1585 fears of Ottoman advances were raising in the country and vast fortification works were initiated, led by the Italian fortress architect G. Ferrari. This is probably why the Ottoman army failed in both its attempts during the years 1585 and 1602.

After these events the castle became part of the King's fiefdom, which he rewarded in 1622 to noble Peter Kohary, for his outstanding actions and efforts in fighting the Ottomans. The 17th Century was a relatively peaceful time for Cabrad Castle, going through the anti-Habsburg rebellions without much event or issue. But also around this time the road which was the castle's reasoning began to lose its importance.

In 1750 the Koháry family gave up on Cabrad Castle as their residence, keeping it for a time as just a summer home until Ferencz József Koháry de Csábrág put the castle to blaze 1812, since then it has remained the ruin it is today, slowly being reclaimed by the surrounding forests.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Slovakia

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michal Šimurka (2 years ago)
A well-preserved ruined castle, about an hours walk from the parking lot. The entrance is free and there's a lot to see - even a brief history of the renovation works. Well worth your time and visit, park at the end of Cabradsky Vrbovok and follow the blue hiking trail.
Martin Majlath (2 years ago)
Old ruins still under reconstruction. With wild surroundings and nice people. Even journey here is adventure and not so many visitors due to 4km walk.
rharris70 (2 years ago)
Great ruins set in forests full of wildlife. Secluded and peaceful, perfect for recharging the batteries. Note: no phone signal there!
Betty Bakker (6 years ago)
Wonderful hike with beautiful forests and varied views and landscapes. Easy to do also for families with children. Castle itself is large and you are free to explore it with few limited access areas. It's being renovated and people working on it are enthousiastic and willing to share stories and informations. From the walls and windows of the castle are priceless views. Beautiful experience.
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