Vác Cathedral

Vác, Hungary

Vác cathedral, built 1761–1777, was modelled after St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. The episcopal palace houses a museum for Roman and medieval artifacts.

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Details

Founded: 1761-1777
Category: Religious sites in Hungary

More Information

budapest.gotohungary.com

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Viktor Olivér Lőrincz (22 months ago)
Beautiful building
Bogdan Balaban (2 years ago)
Massive church. This is probably one of the landmarks of the city. There is a huge place in front of this church. I liked most the statues aboube the columns. It is a great place to visit.
Giulia (2 years ago)
Astonishing building. Very grandiose and nicely kept. On Sunday, I found it open with and without the function going on inside.
Faris Suwaida (2 years ago)
Very nice Catholic Cathedral in Vac county in Hungary
Bence Hajdu (2 years ago)
Amazing cathedral in baroque style. Building started in 1699, but finished about 50 years later. Frescos inside by a renown Austrian painter of the time. The large square in front and the South-Western aspect allows for nice pictures to be taken. Vac in general is well worth a daytrip for the baroque old town and the Danube walk. Many nice cafes, bars and restaurants are available. Parking by car is for a small charge in the centre.
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