St. Francis Xavier Cathedral

Banská Bystrica, Slovakia

The St. Francis Xavier Cathedral was first time mentioned as a gothic chapel at this location in the so-called Königsberger's testament from 1503. It was the only place of Roman Catholic worship during the 16th century, when Banská Bystrica was in the hands of the Protestants.

In 1647 a few Jesuits settled here and started the Catholic reform of the town and its neighbourhood. During the years 1695–1701 they built their own college on the Königberger's site. They started the building of the church in 1702 as a copy of the Church of the Gesu in Rome. The construction came to a halt when in 1703 when the town was occupied by the anti-Habsburg troops of Francis II Rákóczi. The building resumed in 1709 and on 24 September 1715 the church of St. Francis Xavier was consecrated. At that time, the church was a baroque building with a single nave and six chapels. The façade lacked a tower. In 1773 the Jesuits had to leave the church when in July 1773 the Order was suppressed by Pope Clement XIV.

The cathedral has been the seat of the Diocese of Banská Bystrica since 1776. The two onion-shaped towers were added in 1844 during an extensive rebuilding. The nave of the church and the side galleries were lengthened and a consistory was added to the church.

Another modification was performed in 1880. The towers were rearranged and a romantic balustrade was added. In the 1970s the interior was refurbished and, together with the façade, was painted. The exterior was renovated in 1999. In 2003 a new pipe organ was installed.

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Details

Founded: 1702-1715
Category: Religious sites in Slovakia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ľubica Cesnaková (5 months ago)
Pekná katedrála, aj farár pri krste bol cool ?
Martina Matasovska (5 months ago)
Nice view of the city
Ján Foltán (14 months ago)
An exceptional place full of peace ...
Dusan Bobot (2 years ago)
The cathedral is a prominent building from the outside in a burgher estate on the square in Banská Bystrica. The interior is cozy and straightforward to calm down from the hustle and bustle of outside life.
Cyril Francisci (2 years ago)
A valuable historical monument, the recently reconstructed space of the nave, a pleasant place in the city center for meditation, pause and reflection.
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