Banská Bystrica Castle

Banská Bystrica, Slovakia

The Banská Bystrica town castle was once formed by several ancient buildings. Its task was to protect the income proceedings of copper and silver mining for the royal treasury.

The town castle was built gradually. The parish church was built as the first structure in the 13th century and fortifications were added to it in the 15th century. Earth ramparts and palisades were later replaced by tall stone walls fortified by bastions and a water dike. In the 16th century, the Turkish threat called for further fortifications. Only a quarter of the original town walls and three bastions - Farská (Parish), Banícka (Mining), and Pisárska (Scriveners) - of the original four have survived.

The castle's surrounding area includes not only a parish church and fortifications, but also the Church of the Holy Cross - Slovak Church, which was built in 1452, as well as a barbican with a tower. It used to be the entry gate to the castle. The barbican acquired its present Baroque facade after fire in 1761. Between 2005-2006 the barbican was restored again.

The castle also features Matej's House (Matejov dom), which was built in the 15th century in the late Gothic style, and the Old Town Hall - Praetorium which, for its part, was originally designed in the Gothic style, but later was reshaped into a Renaissance building. The latter is currently home to the Central Slovakia Gallerywhich holds graphic biennials plus a variety of temporary exhibitions on a regular basis.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Silvia Orešanská (5 months ago)
Vela sa z neho nezachovalo aj vdaka byvalemu rezimu ale to co zostalo je krasne
Martin Schwarz (6 months ago)
Really nice area and the Klubovna restaurant and pub in barbican is the best
audrey dunne (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle in the gorgeous town of Banska Bystrica! Pedestrianised centre with plenty of restaurant and bar options. Beautiful town square with preserved churches, original facades and clock tower. Wonderful relaxed atmosphere. We ate a delicious meal in the restaurant under the castle. Excellent service and the food was delicious!
Creative One (3 years ago)
Very nice place with a beautiful church and few remnants of a historical castle. It's good to enjoy the local atmosphere and just walk around.
Jiří Dvořák (4 years ago)
This is very nice walking over there.Really recommend you to go there and watch
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