Celemantia (or Kelemantia) was a Roman castellum and settlement on the territory of the present-day municipality Iža. It is the biggest known Roman castellum in present-day Slovakia. It was a part of the Roman Limes, the frontier-zone of the Empire.

A Germanic settlement 'Celemantia' in this area is mentioned by Claudius Ptolemaios in the 2nd century AD. It can be identical with the remnants of a civil settlement found next to the castellum or with another unknown settlement or, as some historians assume, it is the name of both the castellum and the remnants of the civil settlement.

The construction of the castellum started in the latter half of the 1st century. It was conquered during the Marcomannic Wars (166-180) and burned down by Germanic tribes, and was rebuilt later. It ceased to exist around 400 (beginning of the Migration Period). The ruins were very well visible up to the late 18th century, but afterwards people used stones from the constructions to build the fortress and other buildings in Komárno.

According to a local legend, a Roman soldier, Valentin, kept his mistresses in the fortress. The fictitious story explains the origin of the name Leányvár, meaning Girl Castle in Hungarian. However the name probably refers to the fact that the ruins of the castle were donated by King Béla IV of Hungary to the Dominican nuns of Margitsziget who later built a small fortress among them.

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Iža, Slovakia
See all sites in Iža

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Founded: 50-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Slovakia

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Imre Cs. (9 months ago)
It is a pleasure to be able to find such treasures by cycling along the Danube! The fifth star, for my part, is left behind due to the lack of better exploitation of the historical and other endowments of the place. And, the advantage is that Brigetio can be found on the other side of the Danube. :)
Imre Cs. (9 months ago)
It is a pleasure to be able to find such treasures by cycling along the Danube! The fifth star, for my part, is left behind due to the lack of better exploitation of the historical and other endowments of the place. And, the advantage is that Brigetio can be found on the other side of the Danube. :)
Viera Beniačová (10 months ago)
An interesting place, nicely described on the boards. The close proximity of the shooting range is a bit cold
Viera Beniačová (10 months ago)
An interesting place, nicely described on the boards. The close proximity of the shooting range is a bit cold ?
Erika Sarkocyova (11 months ago)
The place is not suitable as a destination, but it can please history lovers. There are no buildings here, only foundations and drawings.
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