The history of Hertník castle dates from the first half of the 16th century when the Hertnik domain became a property of the Forgac family from Jelenec (Gymes). Baron Simon Forgac received Hertnik in 1553 from Ferdinand I for his military merits in the Turkish wars. The castle was built to the site of older fortications and it was a four-tower duplex building with a rectangle plan. A big courtyard was bounded by walls with gateway. The wall was strengthened by the bastions and wide water moat. In 1563 the castle was finished, but rebuilt already in the first half of the 17th century. In 1679 the castle was fired by soldiers of Imrich Tokoli, but at the end of the 17th century it was repaired again.

Hertník castle served as a centre of dominion for 350 years. Stefan Forgac sold the grange to Fridrich Leopold from Anhalt in 1857. The nobility from Desau came there only once or twice a year for huntings. At the beginning of the 20th century a Polish count Dembinski wanted to buy the castle, but it was sold together with whole Hertnik to the 'Magyar Fold' company in 1906. In 1907 this company sold the Hertnik's woods to the Jewish traders. They hired 150 workers to process the wood that lived in the wood in the shepherd's hut. The fields in the Hertnik's surrounding were gradually bought by people from Hertnik. In 1910 these woods and the castle became a possession of the Hungarian state. In the Second World War the castle was damaged and repaired in 1952. The last reconstruction was made 1960-1970 and the castle gained his today's face.

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Hertník, Slovakia
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Founded: 1553-1563
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

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www.obechertnik.szm.com

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