The Imperial Palace in Ingelheim was erected in the second half of the 8th century. Charlemagne chose Ingelheim in 787 as the location for his winter quarters, arriving there before Christmas and remaining there without interruption until the middle of 788. However the palace was not completed before completed before 814. It served Emperors and Kings as a residence and place for governance until the 11th century. From the buildings of the Imperial Palace impressive relics above ground are preserved today. The greater part of the complex remains as foundation under ground level and allows it to be the basis for archaeological excavations to reconstruct the entire system of buildings.

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Details

Founded: c. 787 AD
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Part of The Frankish Empire (Germany)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stefan Reitz (3 years ago)
Wunderschön für kurze Spaziergänge. Der direkt anliegende Spielplatz für Kinder sicherlich eine riesen Freude, da dieser wirklich wundervoll gestaltet und in die alten Gemäuer einbezogen ist. Eine sehr schöne Seite an der Stadt Ingelheim.
Gregor Leier (3 years ago)
Wir sind alle stolz auf unseren Kaisersitz hier in Ingelheim! Ein hoch auf den alten Karl.
Andreas Schulz (3 years ago)
Schöner Ort. Gutes Museum.
Martina H (3 years ago)
Die erhaltenen Mauern sind etwas versteckt, sodass man sich etwas auf die Suche begeben muss, wenn man nicht an einer Führung teilnimmt. Die Häuser und Straßen sind allerdings sehr hübsch, sodass man dort gemütlich spazieren gehen kann. Auch die Aussicht ist bei klarer Sicht toll. Infotäfelchen erläutern die Geschichte, sodass man sich auch ohne Führung gut das ganze zu Gemüte führen kann. Wenn man in Ingelheim ist auf jeden Fall einen Besuch wert.
Michele Laycock (4 years ago)
The area is beautiful, awe inspiring with structures that have lasted well over 1,000 years. Everything (except a pamphlet you can get at the museum) is written in German (the audio tour is also German only) but with Google Translate you can get a fair idea of what happened and when. Certainly worth the trip if you're in the area or visiting other sites near the area. It's in Germany's wine country so if that isn't enough reason to visit, I don't know what is!
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Palazzo Colonna

The Palazzo Colonna is a palatial block of buildings built in part over ruins of an old Roman Serapeum, and has belonged to the prestigious Colonna family for over twenty generations.

The first part of the palace dates from the 13th century, and tradition holds that the building hosted Dante in his visit to Rome. The first documentary mention notes that the property hosted Cardinal Giovanni and Giacomo Colonna in the 13th century. It was also home to Cardinal Oddone Colonna before he ascended to the papacy as Martin V (1417–1431).

With his passing, the palace was sacked during feuds, and the main property passed into the hands of the Della Rovere family. It returned to the Colonna family when Marcantonio I Colonna married Lucrezia Gara Franciotti Della Rovere, the niece of pope Julius II. The Colonna"s alliance to the Habsburg power, likely protected the palace from looting during the Sack of Rome (1527).

Starting with Filippo Colonna (1578–1639) many changes have refurbished and create a unitary complex around a central garden. Architects including Girolamo Rainaldi and Paolo Marucelli labored on specific projects. Only in the 17th and 18th centuries were the main facades completed. Much of this design was completed by Antonio del Grande (including the grand gallery), and Girolamo Fontana (decoration of gallery). In the 18th century, the long low facade designed by Nicola Michetti with later additions by Paolo Posi with taller corner blocks (facing Piazza Apostoli) was constructed recalls earlier structures resembling a fortification.

The main gallery (completed 1703) and the masterful Colonna art collection was acquired after 1650 by both the cardinal Girolamo I Colonna and his nephew the Connestabile Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna and includes works by Lorenzo Monaco, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Palma the Elder, Salviati, Bronzino, Tintoretto, Pietro da Cortona, Annibale Carracci (painting of The Beaneater), Guercino, Francesco Albani, Muziano and Guido Reni. Ceiling frescoes by Filippo Gherardi, Giovanni Coli, Sebastiano Ricci, and Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiari celebrate the role of Marcantonio II Colonna in the battle of Lepanto (1571). The gallery is open to the public on Saturday mornings.

The older wing of the complex known as the Princess Isabelle"s apartments, but once housing Martin V"s library and palace, contains frescoes by Pinturicchio, Antonio Tempesta, Crescenzio Onofri, Giacinto Gimignani, and Carlo Cesi. It contains a collection of landscapes and genre scenes by painters like Gaspard Dughet, Caspar Van Wittel (Vanvitelli), and Jan Brueghel the Elder.

Along with the possessions of the Doria-Pamphilij and Pallavacini-Rospigliosi families, this is one of the largest private art collections in Rome.