Holumnica Castle Ruins

Holumnica, Slovakia

The village of Holumnica was first mentioned in 1293 and was known for cloth production in the 17th century. Due to lack of historical research, it is not clear which of the stately families (Berzeviczy, Ujhazy, or Görgey) built their castle on the village, but it is estimated to 15th or 16th century. The castle was built in Gothic-Renaissance style and it was inhabited until in 17th century when a mansion in the centre of the village has became the family home. Since then the castle stays abandoned. Nowadays only three ruined walls are to be seen and the stork nestle remains the main attraction.

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Holumnica, Slovakia
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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

More Information

www.castles.info

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jassv Es (10 months ago)
škoda že je to zrúcanina
Olinka Kypetová (12 months ago)
Mala zricenina,ale hezka,dobry pristup
Ingrid Bajzíková (19 months ago)
Pekný výhľad na okolie :)
Jozef Petranin (2 years ago)
Z hradu toho uz vela neostalo ale aj tak to bol prijemny zazitok. Hrad je celkom v dedine cize sa autom dostanete az k nemu.
Filip Jurovatý (2 years ago)
Z hradu už veľa neostalo takže si musíte veľa domyslieť ako hrad vyzeral. Pomaly sa už posledné zvyšky strácajú. Ak však máte radi hrady bežte sa sem pozrieť
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