Gjerpen Church

Skien, Norway

Gjerpen church is one of the oldest churches in Norway. It is believed the church was consecrated 28 May 1153 to the apostles Peter and Paul. The church represents the Romanesque style with a cruciform plan after the later additions. The church was extended in 1781 and 1871. The new interior was made by Emanuel Vigeland (1875-1948), this includes the mosaic 'Den bortkomne sønns hjemkomst', glasspaintings, pulpit, baptismal font, benches, lamps and a bronze relief that was drawn in the 1920s. Architects in later time has also included C.Christie and H.Bødker. Vidkun Quisling was buried in the church graveyard after his execution in 1945.

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Håvundvegen 1, Skien, Norway
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Details

Founded: c. 1153
Category: Religious sites in Norway

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hege Helene Schjølberg Henriksen (3 years ago)
Gikk tur
Tapio Aho (4 years ago)
Liv Maritin viimeinen leposia
Anne-Grethe Alfsen (5 years ago)
Historisk
Lukes (5 years ago)
En av Norges mest berømte nordmenn - Vidkun Quilsing ligger begravd her
Bengt Asle Mathisen (5 years ago)
Skiens eldste ⛪ kirke, utfør i stein.
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