Løvøya Chapel

Horten, Norway

Løvøya chapel was built at some time between 1223-1398. The chapel was dedicated to St. Halvard and St. Martin. Its form is known from Orkney and Man islands with a nave and chancel built together. Also the circular light openings in gable walls are typical to this church architecture. After the Reformation in 1536 Løvøya chapel was left to decay for centuries. In 1882 the ruins were restored and in 1950 Løvøya Chapel was reopened to ecclesiastical use.

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Address

Løvøyveien 40, Horten, Norway
See all sites in Horten

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

More Information

www.visitnorway.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Didrik Larsen (8 months ago)
Very nice place
Erik Hagemann-Olsen (8 months ago)
The story tells here
marcin rich (19 months ago)
Lovely place.
Ingunn Aihonen (2 years ago)
??? great chapel that provides a great experience for small concerts. Good acoustics
bernd Degreef (2 years ago)
Well maintained and it is beautifully explained what that church is
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