Murán Castle Ruins

Muráň, Slovakia

Muráň Castle is noteworthy for its unusually high altitude of 935 m. It also figures in several romantic legends about its remarkable owners. Muráň Castle was built in the 13th century on a cliff overlooking a regional trade route. Its name was mentioned for the first time in 1271.

One of its owners, the robber baron Matúš Bašo, transformed the castle into a stronghold of bandits who robbed merchants and looted villages. After a siege by the royal army, the castle fell in 1548 and Matúš Bašo was executed.

Another famous owner was Maria Széchy, better known as 'The Venus of Muráň'. This astonishingly independent woman divorced her second husband to marry the love of her life – magnate Ferenc Wesselényi. When Wesselényi was besieging Muráň Castle, which was occupied by her relatives at the time, she even managed to get his soldiers inside through trickery. In 1666, Wesselényi organized a failed coup against Leopold I, but he died before any major confrontation. Subsequently, Maria Széchy bravely led a defense of the castle against Imperial troops. Outnumbered, she eventually surrendered to Charles of Lorraine in 1670.

The castle was damaged by fire in 1760 and today it is in ruins.

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Muráň, Slovakia
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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Barbora (9 months ago)
Not much to see
Jozef Hudec (10 months ago)
The views from the ruins are breathtaking! The castle has been huge centuries ago, but now it's a broken wall here-and-the in the middle of trees and bushes. The area is large, rails are strong so not much danger of falling to some pit or a valley-but keep your kids under control, please. The access via yellow trail is not for those with ill knees, it's rocky and steep at places. A cottage under the castle serves some food and drinks, but is not cosy, but kind of dark old building. The trip to castle ruins is definitely worth the effort of climbing the steep hills
Peter Adamka (11 months ago)
Great hike. Quite good preserved site. 'Presentation' could be better.
Nazar Go (13 months ago)
Cool place with nice view
László T. (2 years ago)
The ruins are not the most spectacular ones, but the views from there are great, definitely worth the climb.
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