Murán Castle Ruins

Muráň, Slovakia

Muráň Castle is noteworthy for its unusually high altitude of 935 m. It also figures in several romantic legends about its remarkable owners. Muráň Castle was built in the 13th century on a cliff overlooking a regional trade route. Its name was mentioned for the first time in 1271.

One of its owners, the robber baron Matúš Bašo, transformed the castle into a stronghold of bandits who robbed merchants and looted villages. After a siege by the royal army, the castle fell in 1548 and Matúš Bašo was executed.

Another famous owner was Maria Széchy, better known as 'The Venus of Muráň'. This astonishingly independent woman divorced her second husband to marry the love of her life – magnate Ferenc Wesselényi. When Wesselényi was besieging Muráň Castle, which was occupied by her relatives at the time, she even managed to get his soldiers inside through trickery. In 1666, Wesselényi organized a failed coup against Leopold I, but he died before any major confrontation. Subsequently, Maria Széchy bravely led a defense of the castle against Imperial troops. Outnumbered, she eventually surrendered to Charles of Lorraine in 1670.

The castle was damaged by fire in 1760 and today it is in ruins.

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Muráň, Slovakia
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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Steve Turok (3 months ago)
Ruins of an extensive castle. But rather than the ruins, the amazing views from there are the reason of visiting this place. Very steep access, slippery in the snow, so be careful and wear the appropriate shoes.
Neil Goate (3 months ago)
Amazing view at the top, well worth the treacherous hike in the snow and ice ❄❄☃️
Matúš Orban (4 months ago)
Great reward on top after the hike!
John Fabu (5 months ago)
Wide range to explore, nearby is a cave.
Sebastian Sirius (8 months ago)
One of the best places (and castles) I've seen in Slovakia. Fantastic location at Ciganka rock with brilliant views at Gemersky Kras and Muranska Planina.
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