The first record of the castle in Halič dates from the year 1450. In the years 1450-51 it belonged to the Jiskras, later to János Hunyady before becoming inhabited by King Matthias Corvinus in 1462. In the first half of the 16th century it was in property of Istvan Losonczy from Lučenec. The castle was reconstructed, without royal permission, by him and was damaged in 1544 during a siege. After the death of Štefan Lučenský, his daughter Anne inherited the county and married Zsigmund Forgách. The Forgáčs were one of the oldest Hungarian aristocratic family being descendants of the Great Moravian family Poznam, who had preserved their positions in Slovakia after its incorporation into the Kingdom of Hungary. The Halič castle was owned by the Forgáčs until 1945.

Zsigmond Forgách rebuilt the castle on land which had been part of the estate of the owner of the county since 1598, choosing a site that was both strategic and offering natural fortifications. In 1612 it was repaired carefully and the foundations of an irregular hexagon was laid. On top of these; a storied building with six corner bastions was constructed, secured by a ditch and mounds. Wings of this hexagon led into a courtyard with plain walls, later covered with many murals depicting figures of the Roman emperors and the Hungarian kings between its windows and entrances.

At the end of the 17th century Imre Thököly attempted to capture the castle but did not succeed. In 1678, when owned by Adam Forgáč, the castle was besieged again, on this occasion by Turks. The defenders repulsed this attack and also a second attempt in 1703. Six years later Ferenc II Rákóczi overran the castle and in another siege; the leader of the emperor's troops, the General Sigbert Heister, managed to raze parts of the building including the roof and some of the interior equipment.

The Forgáčs had the castle reconstructed in 1762 due to the need of a representative seat in this region. The Austrian Andre Meyerhoffer, was in charge of the works, notable as he was the builder of some of the palaces in Bratislava.

Today Halič castle stays abandoned and waiting the restoration.

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Zámocká, Halič, Slovakia
See all sites in Halič

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Natalia Knoskova (10 months ago)
Beautifull! We loved it!
Jan Rosa (10 months ago)
Really nice ce place
Ivan Kristek (11 months ago)
Very nicely renovated and decorated castle. Went there for the restaurant and was pleasantly surprised. Meal prices are quite steep for the region though. Anyway, I had ossobuco - very tasty, portion was big enough.
SACHIN yadav (12 months ago)
It's a great castle cum hotel...where you can stay for a decent price with a lifetime experience of living in the castle. Coffee is a must try. Food prices according to location is reasonable.
George “Liquidmoo” (2 years ago)
This Hotel is beyond words. It was everything and so much more than I had ever expected it would be. From beautiful surroundings to hidden treasures within. You will have to visit to truly understand its magical qualities. I promise that you will be blown away by its beauty.
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