Rostov Kremlin

Rostov, Russia

Rostov’s impressive Kremlin was built in the 17th century under the orders of the powerful Metropolitan Iona of Rostov. He wanted the town (which in those days still wielded some power in the region) to have one of the most beautiful Kremlins in the country and to that end he dug deep into the church's coffers to build this imposing fortress.

Nowadays within the Kremlin walls there are numerous museums, although unfortunately most of them are of little interest to foreign visitors. It is however well worth climbing up the Kremlin walls and the bell tower, taking a look in the cathedral and checking out the regular art exhibitions.

In front of the Kremlin is the huge 12th century Dormition of Mary Cathedral, which is in essence a working church - although it should be noted that inside it is undergoing a complete renovation. For a small extra fee you can also climb up the adjacent bell tower for a view over the surrounding area.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Big Boss (21 months ago)
Rostov Kremlin - originally the residence of the metropolitan of the Rostov diocese, called the metropolitan (episcopal) court. Located in the center of Rostov near the lake Nero. Currently, the Kremlin ensemble consists of a bishop's courtyard, adjacent to it from the north of the Cathedral Square with the Assumption Cathedral and from the south - the Metropolitan Garden.
Alegria M. (21 months ago)
It was off-season, and some of the churches were closed. Nonetheless, winter snowy cathedrals and churches were real fantasy. Deeply impressed.
Config Diavolo (2 years ago)
Beautiful and charming side with the garden and ancient buildings can alert you to search for history of them.
Julia Shimf (2 years ago)
Needs better orientation guidelines. Even native Russian speakers can find it difficult to find their way around several museums inside the Kremlin. Awesome views from the tower, impressive architecture. Good souvenir market nearby.
Frank G. S. (2 years ago)
Type: Great Kremlin on a lake. + From a tower there is a very nice view of the lake. + Notable small marketplace. - The central entrance is without sign. - The gardens and paths in the Kremlin are poorly maintained.
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