Lille Cathedral

Lille, France

The construction of the Lille Cathedral began in 1854. The church takes its name from a 12th-century statue of the Virgin Mary. It was built to the Neo-Gothic 13th century style. The initial project was massive: 132 metres long, with spires reaching up to over 115 metres. However, wars and financial difficulties soon put an end to these plans. With the creation of the bishopric of Lille in 1913, the basilica became a cathedral, but the project, although reduced to more modest proportions, began to drag on and the cathedral remained unfinished.

It was not until the 1990s that public funding allowed for the completion of the main facade, which was inaugurated in 1999. Designed by the Lille architect Pierre-Louis Carlier, it is the product of great technical prowess and was made possible by the collaboration of Peter Rice (engineer for the Sydney Opera House and the Pompidou Centre in Paris). The central section is composed of a 30 metres high ogive covered with 110 sheets of white marble 28 millimetres thick, and supported by a metal structure. From the inside, this translucent veil reveals a surprising orange-pink colour.At the top, the glass rose window based on the theme of the Resurrection is the work of the painter Ladislas Kijno. The iron doorway is by the Jewish sculptor Georges Jeanclos.

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Address

Place Gilleson, Lille, France
See all sites in Lille

Details

Founded: 1854
Category: Religious sites in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Edith XD (4 months ago)
I really enjoyed the combination of cathedral and modern art.
Amandine Orecchioni (5 months ago)
I absolutely adored this cathedral. I had never seen a modern cathedral before. It was full of light. The art displayed was modern. If you are in the area, do take the time to visit.
Tobias Leenaert (5 months ago)
Very impressive cathedral. The lighting through the painted glad it's beautiful
Deniz Bagci (6 months ago)
Very tasty beers. The stuff they are there the man.
MOHAMMAD RAZAQ (8 months ago)
One of the most beautiful places I visited when I came to France is a place of worship and a very spiritual one and also provides a great history of the place. How much it was a trip worth the effort and rain to this church I recommend visiting it
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