Oponice Castle Ruins

Oponice, Slovakia

Oponice Castle was probably built in the second half of the 13th century by son Peter from the Csák clan. The castle was first mentioned in 1300 as 'Oponh'. Until the death of Máte Csák of Trencsén in 1321, Oponice Castle guarded part of his wide domain in the central Nitra area. The castle was later administered by the royal exchequer until it was passed in 1392 into the hereditary possession of Nicholas Ewres, founder of the Apponyi dynasty.

The castle was expanded and its defenses strengthened, particularly during the threat from Ottoman Turkey, allowing it to withstand enemy onslaughts. Unfortunately, a family dispute over land dating from 1612 meant the end of the castle, punctuated by a fire in 1645 which caused the castle owners to finally abandon it. From time to time the castle was used by the Kurucs, Hungarian insurgents fighting the Habsburgs, until Imperial forces conquered it and had the castle demolished in the early 17th century. The castle's aristocratic tradition remained bound to the Apponyis, who maintained and preserved it until the death of the final descendant from this family, Henrich Apponyi, in 1935.

The castle’s distinct silhouette covers the preserved gun bastion and northeast Renaissance castle up to the third floor.

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Address

593, Oponice, Slovakia
See all sites in Oponice

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marian Lenner (2 years ago)
beautiful, untouched forest on the way to the ruin, easy to get lost, the ruins are just being slowly renovated, state should invest a bit more into this forgotten jewel
Peter Turza (2 years ago)
Love it here. So many memories.
miso demetrian (3 years ago)
Castle is ruined and now under construction, offers great views
Gordon Bloomfield (3 years ago)
Nice castle ruins now undergoing some reconstruction, approximately 3 to 5 km walk depending on how far you dare drive up the track.
Alex B. (4 years ago)
Nice place to walk to. But nothing interesting expect ruins inside
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